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Old February 11th, 2004, 07:26 PM   #1
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Lightbulb *** 6th GENERATION ACCORD FAQ ***




6th Generation Accord V6 FAQ


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FAQ Purpose and Information

The purpose of this FAQ is to address things that come up over and over again repetetively, or is just good general information to have handy all in one easy to use thread. There are always a lot of newer and younger folks getting this car used who have a lot of learning to do. This thread is for you guys. Because us old-timers get tired of answering the same questions for the 27th time.

In an effort to keep information centralized, if a thread is created in the general forums that is already addressed in the FAQs, the thread will be locked with a reference to read the FAQ. Also, this thread will remain locked in order to avoid clutter. However, anybody can contribute to the FAQ by simplying contacting a moderator. If you know of a good thread already created that ought to be added to the FAQ, let a moderator know about it and also post a brief summary of the thread that is brief and concise that can be added here for easy reading and linking (unless of course you're explaining very complex and/or technical things, in which case more is better ). You will be given credit here for anything that you are able to contribute to the FAQ.



How to Use this FAQ

1) Please see the table of contents in the next post below.
2) You can search on one page only by using the Find function of your browser (Ctrl+F in IE)
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Old February 11th, 2004, 07:27 PM   #2
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Table of Contents


General Information

- What Octane fuel should I be using?
- What is up with all of the transmission failures?
- Transmission Lawsuit against Honda
- What is the difference between D3 and D4?
- Coupe Specs, Equipment vs Trim Level, and Year-to-Year Changes
- Sedan Specs, Equipment vs Trim Level, and Year-to-Year Changes


Engine/Performance Information

- What is up with the low-end torque (J30A1 VTEC system explanation)
- Wheel Horsepower vs Crank Horsepower and Dynoing your Accord V6
- Wheel Horsepower vs Crank Horsepower and Dynoing your Accord V6 - Part 2
- Thought about Supercharging your Accord?


Maintenance Information

- What is the Maintenance Required Light?
- How to Change the Clock Light Bulb
- How to Reset the SRS light
- List of Replacement Light Bulbs
- How to Change Rotors
- How to Install Spark Plugs (2000-2002)
- How to Install an Alternator
- Changing the Main Relay
- How to Adjust Valves
- How to Aim Headlights
- How to Check & Replace PCV Valve
- How to Change your Micron Cabin Air Filter (this is the A/C Filter you hear about)
- All Parts for Timing Belt Change

Modifying the Accord

- How to install an Intake
- How to install a Throttle Body Spacer
- How to install Headers
- How to install Springs and Shocks
- How to install any Honda Accessory
- Swapping a CL-S Manual Transmission into the Accord
- How to Install Sway Bars
- How to install tranny cooler
- How to Install a Radio
- How to install a Steering Wheel
- Why the "Tornado" mod doesn't work
- Advanced Engine Modifications
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Old February 11th, 2004, 07:32 PM   #3
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What octane fuel should I be using in the J30A1?

================================================
What octane fuel should I be using in the J30A1?
================================================

A mini-primer on octane, ignition timing, and air-fuel ratio tuning.

The short answer: 87 octane and nothing more. Yes, even for best performance - just 87 octane. Higher octane fuel will actually give you LESS power on the J30A1.

The long answer:The octane requirements of an engine are directly related to the compression ratio of the engine and how it's tuned (primarily ignition timing and air-fuel ratios) from the factory. Combustion chamber design also has a play. It has nothing to do with the number of cylinders (i.e., the J30A1 doesn't need premium just because it has 6 cylinders vs a 4 cylinder.)

By today's standards, the J30A1 runs a relatively low 9.4:1 CR (compression ratio) which decreases its need for octane. 10.0:1 would be considered medium, and 10.5:1 or above would be pretty high for a production general consumer market engine. Typically a 10.0:1 CR is the crossover point on whether an engine will need higher octane fuel or not. A conservatively tuned engine with a 10.0:1 CR can do fine with 87 octane, but one with more advanced tuning will need premium. Due to the J30A1's low compression ratio and also its conservative state of tune (both ignition timing and air-fuel ratio), it performs the best on 87 octane fuel. Anything more will actually DEGRADE performance, not improve it. This was proven by a chassis dyno test on a J30A1 powered Accord by Car & Driver magainze in November 2001, and also proven at the track by previous G6 Accord V6 owners - they ran a few tenths slower due to premium fuel.



Although at the peak the engine only "lost" 4 whp on higher octane fuel, that is nothing compared to the vast amount of power lost in the lower rev range. Although torque was not plotted here, the difference equates to as much as 15 lb-ft of torque lost all throughout the low-end and mid-range which is very significant and would be noticeable on the "butt dyno".

Contrary to popular belief, higher octane fuel does not have more energy per gallon than lower octane fuel - it actually has LESS. Octane is a flame retardant that actually slows down and acts to prevent combustion from happening. Therefore, the more octane in your fuel, the more difficult it is to burn. In order to compensate for this slower and more difficult burn, ignition timing would need to be advanced such that combustion would start much sooner. By the time the piston reaches TDC (Top Dead Center) the combustion process needs to already be at or near its peak such that there is a maximum amount of force available to drive the piston downward with. This ignition timing is set and tuned specifically for 87 octane fuel in the J30A1. With higher octane fuel, combustion takes place more slowly. Since there is no built-in mechanism to properly advance the ignition timing for higher performance and higher octane fuels on the J30A1, this means that with the slower burning fuel there is now LESS power from combustion to force the piston downward with by the time it reaches TDC and this reduces torque output. In addition, any combustion that is still taking place at or beyond 20-25 degrees ATDC (After Top Dead Center) does not contribute significantly to the engine's torque output and is therefore wasted. With higher octane fuel and no timing advance, more of the combustion process is likely to take place at or beyond this range and therefore not contribute to the engine's power.

This is why properly tuned ignition timing is so critical in modern engines. To much timing advance and the knocking phenomenon can occur which can destroy an engine if severe enough (oversimplifying: knocking occurs due to too much compression/timing advance for a given octane level). Too little timing advance and you're not getting the most you can out of the engine and it's not running as efficiently as it could both in terms of torque production, fuel mileage, and even emissions. Since the J30A1 engine does not have a knock sensor that can tell the computer to retard the timing in the event that knocking occurs, this forces Honda to set the default ignition timing extremely conservatively and for the lowest common denominator octane level of 87. Therefore, if you are fueling your J30A1 with anything higher than 87 octane, you are purely wasting your money. As Car & Driver's test concluded, you pay more money for higher octane fuel, but get less power with the J30A1, and that has been backed up by track testing from members here. C&D's panel of experts did not know why exactly that was with the J30A1, but we know here at V6P.

The flip side however is that the J30A1's very conservative NA (naturally aspirated) properties make it ideal for boosting (supercharger, turbo, etc), although you do still need to watchout for knocking since there is no knock sensor. Gaining all-motor performance with the J30A1 is very difficult and expensive, and will have perhaps one of the lowest horsepower gain to dollars spent ratios out of any car out there.

References:
- A search for various combinations of the words octane, ignition, timing, performance, dyno, and compression netted countless excellent technical writeups from respectable sites which I have been reading for some time now.
- OBD-II scanning logs from my Maxima while playing with the knock sensor.

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Old February 11th, 2004, 07:35 PM   #4
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What is the maintenance light?

==============================
What is the maintenance light?
==============================

The maintenance light is simply a service reminder that begins flashing on startup 6000 miles from when it was last reset to remind you of your upcoming 7500 mile service interval. The maintenance light will come on at start-up and stay on when your mileage indicates internally that it was 7500 miles since it was last reset. Dealers do not always properly reset the light, nor will independent oil change or maintenance shops either. Therefore, you will more than likely need to learn how to reset the light yourself. The proper proceedure for this is documented in the owner's manual for your car. If for some reason your car did not come with an owner's manual, a picture of the appropriate page is below. There is lots of good information in the owner's manual, so if you don't have one, consider purchasing one.




References:
- the owner's manual


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Old February 11th, 2004, 07:38 PM   #5
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What is the deal with all of the transmission issues?

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What is the deal with all of the transmission issues?
=========================================

Please see the seperate transmission FAQ thread HERE

In short, Honda's new generation V6 automatic transmissions for their J-series engines (J30A1 Accord, J32A1 Acura TL, etc) have been far from reliable, especially for a Japanese import. To maintain consumer confidence and resale values, Honda has extended the warranty on the transmission only to 7yrs/100k miles on a number of cars across their model lineup. Relating to the Accord specifically...

98-99: NO warranty extension
00-01: 7yr/100k mile warranty extension
02: NO warranty extension (as of this writing)

There is no "recall" nor will there ever be. Recalls are typically only issued if there are safety concerns and are done either voluntarily by the manufacturer or forced by the NHTSA. There are not really any safety concerns with the transmission failures and therefore there will not be any recall. Honda simply replaces the transmission on a case by case basis as they occur.

Although all years of the 6th Generation AV6 have had transmission failures, the worst by far seem to be the 2000-2001 models with the warranty extension. Failures commonly occur between 50-70k miles regardless of modifications or driving style. Members who are either outside of the factory or extended warranty have had success in getting Honda to grant them a "goodwill" transmission replacement. This is in Honda's best interest since they do not want to lose you as a customer. Honda does not have a set policy, but on lower mileage cars they seem more willing to cover 100% of the expenses. On higher mileage cars they may ask you to pay for labor charges ($600-700) or split the replacement cost 50/50 ($1000 to you). A factory rebuilt transmission costs around $2000 and a factory fresh one is upwards of $4000. It is also important to note that the "rebuilt" transmissions have not been any better than the original factory units. If anything, they have been worse and are likely to fail sooner.

Also, no aftermarket bolt-on modification (exception: supercharger ) should give Honda any excuse to not honor your warranty. Please search on Google for the Magnuson-Moss Act. This is a federal law that states that the burden of proof for denying a customer their warranty due to modifications by the owner is on the dealership, not on the customer. In other words, they must prove that your warranty issue was caused by your modifications, not you having to prove that your modifications did *not* cause the problem. If they cannot prove this, then by law they cannot deny you your warranty. There is some room for arugment on lowered suspensions and larger and heavier wheels since this does create additional strain on the transmission. However, it is also important to note that transmission failures commonly occur even on completely factory stock cars, so this argument does not hold much water.

Again, please see the separate Transmission FAQ for further information.

References:

- anybody that has had a failed transmission and has reported their replacement experiences to this forum.


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Old February 11th, 2004, 07:41 PM   #6
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What is the difference between D3 and D4?

=========================================
What is the difference between D3 and D4?
=========================================

D3 simply locks out 4th gear. That's it. It's the equivalent of the "Overdrive On/Off" button on the shifter in many other cars. Honda just uses an extra detent on the shifter instead of a button.

Common myths and misconceptions...

- There is no special more aggressive shift pattern when in D3.
- This transmission does not "learn" your driving pattern.
- The car is not any faster off the line in D3 (it's still using the same 1st gear)
- The car is not any faster off the line in "1" (it's still using the same 1st gear) Updated 2/14/05
- 1/4 mile track performance will not change in D3 vs D4 (this has been tested)
- 1/4 mile track performance will not change by starting in "1" and manually upshifting (also tested, factory shift points are already optimal) Updated 2/14/05

Using D3 *is* recommended (by us enthusiasts ) when travelling around town at sub highway speeds. Since 4th gear is a very tall overdrive gear and the J30A1 does not have much low-end torque, locking out 4th gear and just running in D3 (3rd) will make the car much more responsive and enjoyable to drive.

D3 will also help you when going above 100 mph. (Please do not attempt the following when other cars are around.) The 3rd to 4th shift point when in D4 is approximately 100 mph. However, there is insufficient torque in 4th gear at this point to continue accelerating very much, and 3rd gear will go all the way up to an indicated 122 mph (about 116 mph actual). Therefore, downshift to D3 before the 90 mph cutoff (computer will not allow even a manual downshift to 3rd once above 90) and hold D3 until reaching redline approximately 120 mph. The engine will actually touch redline in 3rd gear twice at full throttle. The first time will be at sub-120 indicated speeds and then the torque converter will go into lockup mode. This will drop the revs from 6300 rpm to about 5900 rpm and then you can gain another 5-10 mph or so. When the tachometer hits redline for the second time, then shift to D4. Try this at your own risk. V6P will not be held responsible for any accidents or injuries. You are responsible for your own driving.

References

- My own personal testing on a "closed course"
- BNut, and a few others who tracked their cars in D3 vs D4 and manual shifting - no difference.


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Old February 11th, 2004, 07:44 PM   #7
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Wheel horsepower vs crank horsepower and dynoing your Accord V6

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Wheel horsepower vs crank horsepower and dynoing your Accord V6.
============================================

Notes about Dynoing in general

The J30A1 engine's SAE net rated power ratings are 200HP @ 5500rpm and 195 lb-ft @ 4700rpm. However, a chassis dynamometer that consumers have access to is MUCH different than the crank engine dynos that manufacturers test the engine alone on. Whereas a crank engine dyno measures engine power directly at the crankshaft output, a chassis dyno measures it at the wheels. Between the engine and the contact patch of the tires there are drivetrain components such as the transmission, torque converter, differential, shafts and axles, and the wheel masses. These components are not "lossless" and take some of the engine's energy - the torque converter in particular. The other major difference is that a crank engine dyno is done with the engine at a steady RPM (i.e. a brake dyno). Chassis dynos are usually the passive rolling load type - meaning the engine is at full throttle while accelerating a large circular drum instead of remaining at a steady RPM. In this case, inertial considerations come into play. The engine does not just spin up freely to redline. Some of the power that the engine generates is used to accelerate the engine itself. The same goes for the transmission, differential, and in particular the wheels. Finally, whatever engine power is left after paying for the inertial costs to spin up all of these components and other drivetrain inefficiencies (torque converter) is what makes it to the tire's contact patch. This is what the dyno reports, and this is what actually accelerates you.

Net result: On the industry standard Dynojet 248C chassis dynamometer, a stock J30A1 Accord will typically see about 155 whp (wheel horsepower) and 145 wtq (wheel torque) versus the crank ratings of 200hp and 195tq. Automatics on this type of dyno will generally see a "loss" of about 22-23% and this is appoximately in line with those numbers. Manual transmissions are usually about 60 pounds lighter than an automatic and also do not have a power sapping torque converter and therefore generally dyno about 5-10% higher than an automatic with the same engine and get much more power to the ground to accelerate you. This is why auto to manual conversions are popular (but difficult) on a lot of cars.

Important Note: You CANNOT directly compare the results from one type of dyno machine to another since the different types read differently. Another popular type of dyno is the Dynapack. This characteristically reads about 6-7% higher than a Dynojet 248C. Therefore, if you are trying to compare Dynapack results to a Dynojet you are comparing apples to oranges. In other words, they are not really comparable. If your friend dynos at 170 whp on a Dynojet and you dyno at 180 whp but on a Dynapack, that does not mean you have 10 whp more than your friend. It simply means that the type of dyno you ran on characteristically reads higher than the Dynojet by about that amount (at these power levels) and that the performance differences between the two cars will be negligible. Even different dynos of the same type can read slightly higher or lower than another. Therefore, when dynoing modifications try to always dyno on the same exact machine to get the most accurate and consistent results.


Notes about dynoing specific to the 6th Generation Accord V6.

Which gear to dyno in.

As it turns out, the 98-02 Accord V6 is actually a pretty difficult car to get a good dyno on. Automatics are always harder to dyno than manuals, and of course all 98-02 AV6s are automatics. To "stage" to get ready to start the dyno, you will need to have the shifter in D3 so that the engine stays in 3rd and then ramp the speed up to about 60 mph. At 60 mph and above, the transmission logic will no longer kick the transmission down to 2nd gear on full throttle even though 2nd will go up to about 73. However, this will only give you a look from 4000 rpm on up. Since it's important to see low/mid-range responsiveness of mods also, the other option is to dyno in "2". This will put the transmission in snow mode. It will not kick-down to 1st gear when full throttle is applied, even from a dead stop. Therefore, you can get a full sweep of the rev-range in 2nd, unlike a 3rd gear dyno.


How to read a dyno chart

DO NOT JUST READ THE PEAK NUMBERS AT THE TOP OF THE CHART BECAUSE ON THIS CAR THEY WILL ALMOST ALWAYS BE WRONG



In addition to that, there is also MUCH more to a dyno than the peak numbers alone. Total area under the curve and curve shape are equally important and modifications can often give drastic changes to the engine's torque curve without actually affecting the peak numbers. LOOK at the graph. All too often people just look at the peak numbers at the top and come to totally wrong conclusions. Below is a stock vs OBX header 3rd gear J30A1 dyno.




The first problem here are the large spikes at the beginning of the dyno. The engine is NOT putting out 175 or even anywhere remotely close to 215 lb-ft of torque to the front wheels. What happened was that instead of staging at about 60 mph in D3, the dyno was done while running up through the gears and started just as the transmission was shifting to 3rd. The large spike is the result of the engine dumping its higher inertial (rotating) energy from redline in 2nd down to a lower RPM in 3rd. This creates a driveline spike and is not "real" power. This automatically throws the peak numbers off at the top and makes them irrelevant.

The second problem is all the way at the right where you see a "hump" in the horsepower and torque curves. In D3 as the engine approaches redline the torque converter will lock. This drops the revs and again causes a smaller but not insignificant "dump" of inertial energy from the engine as it abruptly transitions from higher to lower revs under load. It could also cause calculation errors on the dyno. Again, this is not a real reading of the engine and now the peak numbrers for horsepower listed at the top are once again thrown off and made irrelevant.

The relevant part of the dyno starts at 4400rpm after the 2-3 upshift spikes, and ends at 6100 rpm before the torque converter locks in 3rd gear. However, these two phenomenas are locked in by the peak reading registers of the dyno software and this is what it reports. But those numbers are wrong. You must look at the actual curves and what your engine is doing to get the accurate numbers. In this case the results are as follows.

Stock Horsepower: 158 whp @ 5700rpm (but read 169.1 whp from the torque converter locking)
Stock Torque: 143 wtq @ 4600 rpm (but read 175.9 wtq from the 2-3 upshift spike)

Modded Horsepower: 168 whp @ 5800rpm (but read 177.6 whp from the torque converter locking)
Modded Torque: 154 wtq @ 4600 rpm (but read 215.0 wtq from the 2-3 upshift spike)

REAL GAINS: 10 whp and 11 wtq (According to the peak numbers listed: 8.5 whp and 39.1 wtq )


Other common dyno interpretation mistakes

You cannot directly compare 2nd gear and 3rd gear numbers. First off, the acceleration rate in 2nd gear is higher and this means there will be higher inertial losses (inertial resistance is a function of acceleration) and this could possibly skew your 2nd gear numbers lower. 3rd gear has a lower rate of acceleration and therefore inertial losses will be lower. Because of this, in theory 3rd gear dynos should give slighlty higher numbers although there are many variables. Finally, the torque converter will not lock in 2nd, but it will in 3rd. Since 3rd gear gets the "hump" from the torque converter locking and 2nd does not, this can again throw off interpretation. A certain person who shall remain nameless once did a 2nd gear baseline dyno and then did a post V-AFC tuning dyno in 3rd. They then went around the forum claiming that they gained over 20 whp from tuning when most others only gain 10. However, they incorrectly interpreted the dynos by only reading the peak numbers at the top , and did not take the 10 whp torque converter lock spike out. Accounting for that, they only gained 10 whp which is not any more or less than anybody else. This creates unjustified hype and a lot of misinformation on the forums and is not appreciated by us moderators who try very hard to maintain the quality of information here for the benefit of our members. So please try not to make these mistakes anymore.

Get dynos in SAE corrected form. SAE correction accounts for barometric pressure, temperature, and humidity, all of which can have a significant affect on engine performance. SAE correction therefore allows you to compare your results to others on a much more level playing field.

Pay attention to the scales. On the above dyno one could look easily believe that they are making over 200 whp. However, that is the torque scale, not the horsepower scale. Although it's generally "good practice" to keep the scales between horsepoweer and torque the same, this is not always done. The scale for horsepower is all the way over on the left.


References

- anybody that has dynoed their car and posted it here


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Old February 11th, 2004, 07:45 PM   #8
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Dynoing - Part 2

Hit the character limit


One last suggestion. Bring a floppy disk with you to the shop. You should be able to get your dyno runs on floppy disk. Dynojet has a downloadable dynoviewer program that allows you to set the scales and SAE correction to your liking and the software is excellent. It's also much easier to post dynos with a screen capture from the program instead of with a digital camera or a scanner.

Lastly, it's "okay" if you don't dyno on a Dynojet dyno. But the vast majority of people out there are using the Dynojets, so if you dyno on say a Dynapack your results just won't be directly comparable to most others out there since different types of dynos read differently. Just be sure to dyno on the same type of dyno (and same exact machine if possible) when dynoing at different stages so that your numbers are relevant and as consistent as possible.



If anybody has problems interpreting their dyno charts after this, you will be hurt. Badly.
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Old February 11th, 2004, 07:51 PM   #9
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What is the deal with the low-end torque? - VTEC system explanation

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What is the deal with the low-end torque? - VTEC system explanation
=================================================

You may notice after you have had your car for awhile that the J30A1 just doesn't have very good low-end torque for a V-6 engine. This is primarily because of the quasi "VTEC-E" for economy VTEC system being used in the engine, but also due to the factory ignition timing settings being extremely conservative.

What is VTEC-E?

To understand what VTEC-E is, you really need to understand how VTEC systems work and the various types of systems out there first. This has already been written about quite extensively by Lee Cao, so I would highly recommend checking out and reading through Lee's excellent work HERE. In particular, checkout these two links if you are short on time.

SOHC VTEC-E: http://www.leecao.com/honda/vtec/sohcvtece.html
3-stage VTEC: http://www.leecao.com/honda/vtec/3stagevtec.html

In a nutshell, the J30A1 engine has a hybrid VTEC-E system that is most similar to a 3-stage VTEC system, but without the 2nd stage. In comparison to the normal performance-oriented VTEC systems or non-VTEC engines where both intake valves are opened at low-RPM, a VTEC-E engine only opens one intake valve at low-revs. See figures below.

From: SAE 970916 - Honda 3.0 Liter, New V6 Engine

J30A1, Low-RPM Operation


J30A1, High-RPM Operation


This helps to create a swirling effect which improves emissions and fuel economy. But there is only so much air volume that can be squeezed through one intake valve with a lower amount of lift, and therefore when the throttle is jabbed hard the engine is literally breathing through a straw. As an analogy, you can get away with breathing through a straw when you're sitting still and physically idle. Now go out jogging and try breathing through a straw. Your demand for air is up, but you can't breathe in enough air through a tiny straw fast enough and you will suffocate. On a 3-stage VTEC system this is almost a moot point because that's what the 2nd stage is for. However, multiple stages are more complex and costly to build. Therefore, Honda chose to push the 1st stage to perform all the way up to the mid-range VTEC crossover point of 3500 rpm where suddenly the "3rd stage" picks up. However, the 3rd stage is designed for high-end use, not mid-range, so again there is a bit of a lag. Even though the VTEC crossover is 3500 rpm, it still takes until about 4000 rpm for the engine to finally get into full swing and get into the peak torque range for serious performance.

Here is a dyno analysis of the J30A1 engine versus its peers which are also 3.0L engines.

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As you can see, the J30A1 is down quite a bit on low-end and mid-range torque compared to the competition. The VTEC-E system is part of that, but also the low compression ratio and conservative ignition and fuel tuning of the engine. From 3000-3500rpm the torque output is actually dropping because the "1st stage" cam is already bottlenecking and can't handle the flow requirements being asked of it. At the 3500 rpm switchover now the engine is on the "3rd stage", but this stage is still a bit too aggressive for the RPM and hence it takes another 500 rpm for this cam profile to get in the sweet spot. A proper 3-stage VTEC system with the 2nd stage implemented would all but eliminate the low-end and mid-range issues that the J30A1 engine has. The J30A4 engine in the 2003+ Accord V6s now has a true performance-oriented VTEC system (both valves opening at low-revs) and has much better overall performance all around.

What can you do about it?

If you feel that performance is not sufficient, focus on modifications that will improve (not hurt) low-end and mid-range responsiveness. An intake will help all-around, as will headers. Unorthodox Racing (UR) Pulleys are also an excellent mod that will greatly improve performance, and dyno tuning with a V-AFC will help as well.

Things to avoid: larger and heavier wheels and tires. These have inertial resistances to acceleration and will greatly impact performance, especially on torque deficient engines. Also avoid cat-back exhaust systems. These systems improve top-end performance, but at the expense of low-end and mid-range performance. If you want/need an exhaust system, stick with an axle-back system instead. The gains at the top-end are not as much, but the low-end losses are much more minimal as well.


References:

- www.leecao.com (excellent site which explains the operation of different VTEC systems)
- www.hondanews.com (good technical resource on the engines in general)
- Member BNut, for actually doing a 2nd gear dyno to confirm the low-end issues
- Member -=SoCalv6=- for digging up the cam specs and noticing the low lift on the secondary intake valve.
- Me, for digging up dyno data to compare with from competing manufacturer's 3.0L engines.
- SAE 970916 - Honda 3.0 Liter, New V6 Engine (SAE Technical Paper)

FAQ Credit: SteVTEC
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Old February 17th, 2004, 03:04 AM   #10
 
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==================================================
What are all of the year to year changes on the 6th gen Accord V6 coupe?
==================================================
Changes between model years. All specs and features are for both LX V6 and EX V6 unless otherwise noted.

1998 Accord LX V6 & EX V6 Coupe

Body-Suspension-Chasses

- Body Type - Unit Body
- Suspension - Multi-Link 4-Wheel Double Wishbone
- Stabilizer Bar (mm., front/rear) - 27.2/17.0
- Steering Type - Variable-Assist Power
- Turning Diameter Curb-to-Curb (ft.) - 36.1
- 4-Wheel Disc Brakes - w/Anti-Lock Brakes
- Wheels - 15" w/Full Covers (LX V6) - 16" Alloy (EX V6)
- Tires: All-Season - P205/65 R15 92V (LX V6) - P205/60 R16 91V (EX V6)
- Spare Tire - Compact

Drivetrain

- Type - Front Wheel Drive
- Automatic Transmission - 4-Speed
- Final Drive Ratio (AT) - 4.20
- 1st Gear Ratio: 2.53
- 2nd Gear Ratio: 1.50
- 3rd Gear Ratio: 0.95
- 4th Gear Ratio: 0.61

Engine

- Type: Aluminum Alloy - V6
- Displacement (liters) - 3.0
- [email protected] (SAE net) - [email protected]
- Torque ([email protected]) - [email protected]
- Compression Ratio - 9.4:1
- Valve Train: SOHC - 24-Valve VTEC
- Fuel System - Multi-Point Fuel Injection
- Ignition System - Electronic w/Immobilizer

EPA Fuel Mileage Estimates/Fuel Capacity

- City/Highway (4-Speed Automatic) - 20/28
- Fuel (gal.) - 17.1

Exterior Dimensions

- Wheelbase (in.) - 105.1
- Length (in.) - 186.8
- Height (in.) - 55.1
- Width (in.) - 70.3
- Track (in., front/rear) - 61.1/60.4
- Curb Weight (lbs., AT) - 3197 (LX V6) - 3241 (EX V6)

Exterior Features

- Power Moonroof w/Tilt Feature (EX V6)
- Integrated Rear Window Antenna
- Body-Colored Door Handles
- Body-Colored Dual Power Mirrors
- Alloy Wheels - Accessory (LX V6) - 16" (EX V6)
- Multi-Reflector Halogen Headlights - (LX & EX V6) - w/Auto Off (EX V6)
- Security System w/Remote Entry - Accessory (LX V6) - Standard (EX V6)
- Body Colored Impact Absorbing Bumpers

Exterior and Interior Colors

- Dark Emerald Pearl/Ivory - w/Cloth (LX V6) - w/Leather (EX V6)
- Taffeta White/Ivory - w/Cloth (LX V6) - w/Leather (EX V6)
- San Marino Red/Ivory - w/Cloth (LX V6) - w/Leather (EX V6)
- Black Currant Pearl/Quartz - w/Leather (EX V6)
- Flamenco Black Pearl/Charcoal - w/Cloth (LX V6) - w/Leather (EX V6)
- Regent Silver Metallic/Charcoal - w/Cloth (LX V6)

Interior Dimensions

- Headroom (in., front/rear) - 39.7/36.5 (LX V6) - 38.0/36.5 (EX V6)
- Legroom (in., front/rear) - 42.6/32.4
- Shoulder Room (in., front/rear) - 56.0/55.4
- Hiproom (in., front/rear) - 52.1/46.1
- Cargo Volume (cu. ft.) - 13.6
- Interior Passenger Volume (cu. ft.) - 92.7 (LX V6) - 90.4 (EX V6)

Interior Features

- Driver's and Front Passenger's Airbags
- Leather-Trimmed Seats and Door Panel Inserts - (EX V6)
- Leather-Wrapped Steering Wheel - Accessory (LX V6) - Standard (EX V6)
- Driver's Seat w/8-Way Power Adjustment
- Driver's Seat Adjustable Lumbar Support (EX V6)
- Wood-Grain Interior Trim - Accessory (LX V6) - Standard (EX V6)
- Power Windows w/Auto-Down Driver's Window
- Power Door Locks
- Cruise Control
- Air Conditioning w/Air Filtration System - (LX V6) - Automatic Climate Control (EX V6)
- AM/FM High-Power Stereo - w/Cassette & 4 Speakers (LX V6) - w/CD Player & 6 Speakers (EX V6)
- Steering Wheel-Mounted Audio Controls (EX V6)
- HomeLink® Remote System (EX V6)
- Map Lights
- Beverage Holders, Front and Rear
- Sunglasses Holder
- Center Console Armrest w/Storage Compartments
- Adjustable Steering Column
- Tachometer
- 2-Speed/Variable Intermittent Windshield Wipers
- 3-Point Seat Belts - All Seating Positions
- Front 3-Point Seat Belts w/Automatic Tensioning System
- 60/40 Split Fold-Down Rear Seatback w/Lock
- Remote Fuel Filler Door Release
- Remote Trunk Release w/Lock
- Electronic Remote Trunk Release (EX V6)
- Trunk-/Door-Open, Low-Fuel Indicator Lights
- Rear Window Defroster w/Timer
- Cargo Area Light
- Coin Box
- Rear-Seat Heater Ducts
- Driver's and Passenger's Illumined Vanity Mirrors
- Side Door Pockets
- Lockable Glove Compartment w/Light
- Quartz Digital Clock
- Trunk Cargo Net - Accessory (LX V6) - Standard (EX V6)
- Maintenance Interval Indicator

1999 Accord LX V6 & EX V6 Coupe

Changes from 1998 Model

Exterior Features

- Body Colored Dual Power Mirrors - Folding

2000 Accord LX V6 & EX V6 Coupe

Changes from 1999 Model

Engine

- Ignition System - Electronic w/Immobilizer - Direct

Exterior Dimensions

- Curb Weight (lbs., AT) - 3215 (LX V6) - 3259 (EX V6)

Exterior And Interior Colors

Colors Added
- Satin Silver Metallic/Charcoal - w/Cloth (LX V6) - w/Leather (EX V6)
- Nighthawk Black Pearl/Charcoal - w/Cloth (LX V6) - w/Leather (EX V6)

Colors Removed
- Black Currant Pearl/Quartz - w/Cloth (LX V6) - w/Leather (EX V6)
- Flamenco Black Pearl/Charcoal - w/Cloth (LX V6) - w/Leather (EX V6)

Interior Features

- Driver's and Front Passenger's Side Airbags (SRS)

2001 Accord LX V6 & EX V6 Coupe

Changes for 2000 Model

Body-Suspension-Chasses

- Traction Control

Exterior Dimensions

- Curb Weight (lbs., AT) - 3236 (LX V6) - 3283 (EX V6)

Exterior And Interior Colors

Colors Added
- Naples Gold Metallic/Ivory - w/Cloth (LX V6) - w/Leather (EX V6)

Interior Features

- Painted Brushed Aluminum Interior Trim (EX V6)
- AM/FM Stereo - w/CD Player & 6 Speakers (LX V6) - w/Cassette, CD Changer & 6 Speakers (EX V6)
- Floor Mats
- Child-Seat Tether Anchors

2002 Accord EX V6 Coupe

Changes from 2001 Model

Exterior And Interior Colors

Colors Added
- Noble Green Pearl/Ivory - w/Cloth (LX V6) - w/Leather (EX V6)

Colors Removed
- Dark Emerald Pearl/Ivory - w/Cloth (LX V6) - w/Leather (EX V6)


Source: Honda of America’s website, www.hondacars.com

Credit: Plumaccordcoupe



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Old February 22nd, 2004, 04:27 PM   #11
 
Join Date: Mar 2002
Posts: 14,633
==================================================
What are all of the year to year changes on the 6th gen Accord V6 sedan?
==================================================
Changes between model years. All specs and features are for both LX V6 and EX V6 unless otherwise noted.

1998 Accord LX V6 & EX V6 Sedan

Body-Suspension-Chasses

- Body Type - Unit Body
- Suspension - Multi-Link 4-Wheel Double Wishbone
- Stabilizer Bar (mm., front/rear) - 27.2/16.0
- Steering Type - Variable-Assist Power
- Turning Diameter, Curb-to-Curb (ft.) - 36.4
- 4-Wheel Disc Brakes - w/Anti-Lock Brakes
- Wheels - 15" w/Full Covers (LX V6) - 15" Alloy (EX V6)
- Tires: All-Season - 205/65 R15 92V (LX V6) - 205/65 R15 92V (EX V6)
- Spare Tire - Compact

Drivetrain

- Type - Front Wheel Drive
- Automatic Transmission - 4-Speed
- Final Drive Ratio (AT) - 4.20
- 1st Gear Ratio: 2.53
- 2nd Gear Ratio: 1.50
- 3rd Gear Ratio: 0.95
- 4th Gear Ratio: 0.61

Engine

- Type: Aluminum Alloy - V6
- Displacement (liters) - 3.0
- [email protected] (SAE net) - [email protected]
- Torque ([email protected]) - [email protected]
- Compression Ratio - 9.4:1
- Valve Train: SOHC - 24-Valve VTEC
- Fuel System: Multi-Point Fuel Injection
- Ignition System - Electronic w/Immobilizer

EPA Fuel Mileage Estimates/Fuel Capacity

- City/Highway (4-Speed Automatic) - 20/28
- Fuel (gal.) - 17.1

Exterior Dimensions

- Wheelbase (in.) - 106.9
- Length (in.) - 188.8
- Height (in.) - 57.3
- Width (in.) - 70.3
- Track (in., front/rear) - 61.2/60.4
- Curb Weight (lbs., AT) - 3241 (LX V6) - 3285 (EX V6)

Exterior Features

- Power Moonroof w/Tilt Feature (EX V6)
- Integrated Rear Window Antenna
- Body-Colored Door Handles
- Body-Colored Dual Power Mirrors
- Alloy Wheels - Accessory (LX V6) - 15" (EX V6)
- Multi-Reflector Halogen Headlights - (LX & EX V6) - w/Auto Off (EX V6)
- Security System w/Remote Entry - Accessory (LX V6) - Standard (EX V6)
- Body Side Molding - (LX V6) - Body-Colored (EX V6)
- Body Colored Impact Absorbing Bumpers

Exterior and Interior Colors

- Heather Mist Metallic/Ivory - w/Cloth (LX V6) - w/Leather (EX V6)
- Taffeta White/Ivory - w/Cloth (LX V6) - w/Leather (EX V6)
- Black Currant Pearl/Quartz - w/Cloth (LX V6) - w/Leather (EX V6)
- Flamenco Black Pearl/Charcoal - w/Cloth (LX V6) - w/Leather (EX V6)
- Dark Emerald Pearl/Ivory - w/Cloth (LX V6) - w/Leather (EX V6)

Interior Dimensions

- Headroom (in., front/rear) - 40.0/37.6 (LX V6) - 38.5/36.5 (EX V6)
- Legroom (in., front/rear) - 42.1/37.9
- Shoulder Room (in., front/rear) - 56.9/56.1
- Hiproom (in., front/rear) - 54.9/54.1
- Cargo Volume (cu. ft.) - 14.1
- Interior Passenger Volume (cu. ft.) - 101.7 (LX V6) - 98.3 (EX V6)

Interior Features

- Driver's and Front Passenger's Airbags
- Leather-Trimmed Seats and Door Panel Inserts - (EX V6)
- Leather-Wrapped Steering Wheel - Accessory (LX V6) - Standard (EX V6)
- Driver's Seat w/8-Way Power Adjustment
- Driver's Seat Adjustable Lumbar Support (EX V6)
- Wood-Grain Interior Trim - Accessory (LX V6) - Standard (EX V6)
- Power Windows w/Auto-Down Driver's Window
- Power Door Locks
- Cruise Control
- Air Conditioning w/Air Filtration System - (LX V6) - Automatic Climate Control (EX V6)
- AM/FM High-Power Stereo - w/Cassette & 4 Speakers (LX V6) - w/CD Player & 6 Speakers (EX V6)
- Steering Wheel-Mounted Audio Controls (EX V6)
- HomeLink® Remote System (EX V6)
- Map Lights
- Beverage Holders, Front and Rear
- Sunglasses Holder
- Center Console Armrest w/Storage Compartments
- Adjustable Steering Column
- Tachometer
- 2-Speed/Variable Intermittent Windshield Wipers
- 3-Point Seat Belts - All Seating Positions
- Front 3-Point Seat Belts w/Automatic Tensioning System
- Adjustable Front Seat Belt Anchors
- Fold-Down Rear Seatback w/Lock
- Fold-Down Rear Seat Center Armrest
- Trunk Pass-Through w/Lock
- Remote Fuel Filler Door Release
- Remote Trunk Release w/Lock
- Electronic Remote Trunk Release (EX V6)
- Trunk-/Door-Open, Low-Fuel Indicator Lights
- Rear Window Defroster w/Timer
- Cargo Area Light
- Coin Box
- Rear-Seat Heater Ducts
- Driver's and Passenger's Vanity Mirrors - Illumined
- Side Door Pockets - Front and Rear
- Lockable Glove Compartment w/Light
- Quartz Digital Clock
- Maintenance Interval Indicator

1999 Accord LX V6 & EX V6 Sedan

Changes from 1998 Model

Exterior Features

- Body Colored Dual Power Mirrors - Folding

2000 Accord LX V6 & EX V6 Sedan

Changes from 1999 Model

Engine

- Ignition System - Electronic w/Immobilizer - Direct

Exterior Dimensions

- Curb Weight (lbs., AT) - 3274 (LX V6) - 3318 (EX V6)

Exterior And Interior Colors

Colors Added
- Signet Silver Metallic/Quartz - w/Cloth (LX V6) - w/Leather (EX V6)
- Nighthawk Black Pearl/Charcoal - w/Cloth (LX V6) - w/Leather (EX V6)
- Naples Gold Metallic/Ivory - w/Cloth (LX V6) - w/Leather (EX V6)

Colors Removed
- Heather Mist Metallic/Ivory - w/Cloth (LX V6) - w/Leather (EX V6)
- Black Currant Pearl/Quartz - w/Cloth (LX V6) - w/Leather (EX V6)
- Flamenco Black Pearl/Charcoal - w/Cloth (LX V6) - w/Leather (EX V6)

Interior Features

- Driver's and Front Passenger's Side Airbags (SRS)
- Child-Seat Tether Anchors

2001 Accord LX V6 & EX V6 Sedan

Changes for 2000 Model

Body-Suspension-Chasses

- Traction Control

Exterior Dimensions

- Curb Weight (lbs., AT) - 3274 (LX V6) - 3329 (EX V6)

Exterior Features

- Body-Colored Side Molding

Exterior And Interior Colors

Colors Added
- Dark Emerald Pearl/Lapis - w/Cloth (LX V6) - w/Leather (EX V6)
- Satin Silver Metallic/Quartz - w/Cloth (LX V6) - w/Leather (EX V6)
- Firepepper Red Pearl/Ivory - w/Cloth (LX V6) - w/Leather (EX V6)

Colors Removed
- Dark Emerald Pearl/Ivory - w/Cloth (LX V6) - w/Leather (EX V6)
- Signet Silver Metallic/Quartz - w/Cloth (LX V6) - w/Leather (EX V6)

Interior Features

- AM/FM Stereo - w/CD Player & 6 Speakers (LX V6) - w/Cassette, CD Changer & 6 Speakers (EX V6)
- Passenger's Seat with 4-Way Power Adjustment (EX V6)
- Floor Mats
- Rear LATCH (Lower Anchors and Tethers for Children)
- Emergency Trunk Opener

2002 Accord EX V6 Sedan

Changes from 2001 Model

Exterior And Interior Colors

Colors Added
- Noble Green Pearl/Ivory - w/Cloth (LX V6) - w/Leather (EX V6)

Colors Removed
- Dark Emerald Pearl/Ivory - w/Cloth (LX V6) - w/Leather (EX V6)


Source: Honda of America’s website, www.hondacars.com

Credit: Plumaccordcoupe



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Old March 17th, 2006, 08:57 AM   #12
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