The official Film SLR thread?? - Honda Accord Forum : V6 Performance Accord Forums
Ribbon Banner

Go Back   Honda Accord Forum : V6 Performance Accord Forums > GENERAL DISCUSSION > RANDOM CHATTER > TECHNOLOGY CORNER > V6P PHOTOGRAPHY CLUB
Register FAQ Members List Calendar Mark Forums Read Insurance
V6Performance.net is the premier Honda Accord Forum on the internet. Registered Users do not see the above ads.

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
Old July 1st, 2008, 01:31 PM   #1
"Certified Hybrid Killer"
 
SteVTEC's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2001
Location: Commietown, MD
Posts: 5,056
Talking The official Film SLR thread??

I picked up one of these recently...




AND LOVE IT!

I never shot film seriously. I was getting more serious about photography right at the dawn of the digital era so I waited around for better and more affordable digital gear rather than investing in film equipment. But the more I learned and read about film after buying two DSLRs, the more I couldn't help but think that I was missing something. And eventually if I get curious enough I just have to try something out for myself, so... A few weeks ago I saw a model I had my eye on come up for sale on NikonCafe and pulled the trigger, spending just a tad over $300 for a mint Nikon F100 with the battery grip from a very reputable seller and couldn't be happier! Yes, I was missing a whole bunch on film.


Things I didn't know about or was under-appreciating about film


You are NOT "hard-locked" to your film's ISO speed If you're shooting 400 speed negative print film you aren't hard-locked to shooting it at that speed. Little did I know, a lot of the negative print film out there has so much under/over-exposure latitude that you can literally shoot them anywhere between ASA/ISO 100 and 1600 and not even have to bother with any sort of special push or pull processing. I didn't even know that special processing like that existed either, for the more sensitive films. Yet another thing I was taking for granted. Just like with digital, the higher you crank up the ISO or deviate away from the base ISO of the camera (or film), the lower the quality gets.

Grain is not a BAD thing: I couldn't help but think that a lot of the photos off of my Nikon D80 and D40 DSLRs were "too plasticy" looking and too synthetically processed and manipulated. It's tough to get away from that, even if you're shooting RAW. I honestly do LIKE the texture and richness that film grain can add to images which gives it a richer look, and not the plasitcy smooth looked of so many DSLRs these days. Nikon has long been criticized for their "poor high ISO performance". I think the "noise" and graininess of some of these DSLRs was actually intended to maintain the look and feel of some film grain believe it or not!

Exposure isn't NEARLY as critical as it is on digital - plenty of shoulder area: Granted my D80 and D40 Nikons aren't known for having the best metering, but trying to fight highlight blowouts and dropping shadows and maintaining correct exposure is a CONSTANT and annoying battle on DSLRs, which is even worse on the D40/D80 because of their stupid metering algorithms. There's soooo much of a shoulder for highlights on negative print film that it's just plain nutty. Never before in nearly 30,000 photos have I seen a pale blue sky with very light clouds like I do here.



Easy to take for granted, but this seriously blew my mind when I saw it. On digital either the sky is far darker and the clouds much more well-defined but almost everything else is dark, or the foreground is better exposed but the sky is a pure ugly white blowout! I made this shot with NO FILTERS on the F100 and Fuji Superia 400 print film. Because of this huge film shoulder, it makes it ridiculously easy to get completely natural looking photos.

Another example, a leaf:



Here's a 100% crop from a Costco 6MP scan



Does that look sharp to you? Does the grain look hideous? Can you still see details in the highlight area where the sun is reflecting? I can still see plenty of detail, the film grain is far less than what I thought it would be and actually looks nice, and it's plenty sharp. And this was just a crappy Costco 6MP scan! This is just as good if not better than either my D40 or D80 and you can get the same results for less than $200 total including a cheaper body and a lens which will also BLOW AWAY any point and shoot.

Another example, inside a restaurant, no flash. The wall decorations are nicely exposed, yet you can actually SEE what's outside the window and that there's a tree there and a building rather than going to flat ugly WHITE like digital does!



A beach shot: Look ma, no ugly blown highlights!




None here either! lol




Very little post processing needed: I've run about a dozen rolls of film through my F100 now and I can say this. It's very easy to make a sucky shot on any of my digitals, but far harder to do the same on film. DSLR sensors all use the Bayer pattern interpolation and have anti-aliasing filters, all of which lead to softer images and the need for post-processing. All of my F100 shots have been SHARP and I've only been using a cheap $140 Nikkor 28-105mm f/3.5-4.5 lens and a 50mm prime, along with crappy Costco 6MP scans. And with far better latitude for the exposure being off, there's no need to screw around pushing one photo a stop while trying to recover highlights on another shot. White balance? What's that? One of THE most annoying things with DSLRs to me has been all the "need" to fiddle and post-process. Funk dat. I don't have time for that crap. My wife and I both work full-time and we've got a baby to take care of and a house to maintain. Photos come off my F100 and from Costco looking perfect with no real need to touch or tweak the photos at all like I almost always have to on digital.

Want a whole new look? Just swap out your film! I personally don't enjoy screwing around in Photoshop, and yes I consider it "screwing around" in Photoshop. And you can't exactly swap out your DSLR sensor either if it doesn't do what you want it to do. This is Ilford XP2 400 Super B&W film, which can be processed at regular C-41 color processing labs like Costco.



I LOVE the texture here! There's actually SUBSTANCE in the out of focus area, rather than flat monotonous boring plasticy looking smoothed over nothingness like on digital. And you can get just about any look that you want? Why spend hours post-processing my stupid DSLR photos in DxO software applying various "film profiles" which I always liked if I could just shoot film to begin with!


Film doesn't have to be expensive Film bodies are dirt cheap. The Nikon F100 was a one step below top of the line camera in its day selling for $1400 new, sorta like where the D300/D700 are today below the D3. I got mine for a little over $300 including the optional battery grip, but you can get them in the low/mid-$200 range too! The N80 is just as good in a lot of ways and weighs less. You can get these things practically new on eBay for less than $100! I only spent more for an F100 because I wanted to try out a more pro level camera and because I wanted the faster 1/250s flash sync on it. The N80 only does 1/125s flash sync and is a cheaper lighter more plasticy build but otherwise about as good. I picked up a used Nikkor 28-105mm f/3.5-4.5 lens used for $140 shipped which is equivalent to the Nikon 18-70DX lens. The "nifty fifty" lenses for $100 which are too long on most DSLRs are "normal" and quite useful on film cameras too. Or get any cheap zoom lens. My D80 cost me $1100 NEW just two years ago! If I had known how nice film was back then I might have saved myself a rather large chunk of money. In a lot of ways even the latest digital sensor technology is still trying to achieve what film has been able to do for decades! For processing I use my local COSTCO. The total price to develop a 36 exposure roll of film along with 5x7" prints and getting 6MP scans on CD is a whopping 8 bucks. I could go cheaper and only get 4x6" prints or skip the prints altogether and get it even cheaper. Ken Rockwell has a great article on Costco film processing HERE which has been a huge help to me.


My Digital SLRs aren't going anywhere They still have their place, just like film does. Digital is fast, fun, convenient, more adaptable to changing conditions quicker, and instant gratification. But sadly filled with nuances. I definitely think it's easier to learn on digital because you can instantly see results, you know exactly how you took a photo from the EXIF data, and can get a feel much faster for what sort of a shutter speed or aperture you need for a given situation. And if you blow a shot you know it instantly and can re-take a photo. It's easy to project that onto film too, but a lot of the nuances of digital doesn't apply to film. Because of the huge latitude and better sharpness of film, it's honestly been tough for me to take a technically bad shot compared to digital. This thing just keeps cranking out winner after winner. Film has its nuances too, just different ones is all. So it's nice to have both.


Film is now WIFE APPROVED! : She was a skeptical naysayer at first like she is of most new things, but even my wife likes the film results better than digital. No highlight blowouts which even she noticed, fewer exposure issues that need correcting, even the Costco scans are very sharp, the prints look great, and I don't have to waste nearly as much time sitting in front of the computer "fixing" stuff on digital. When the film and prints come back from Costco they're just DONE and all we do is pickout the ones we like the best. For a reasonable sized enlargement I can just order one from the scan, or for a super-sized one I can just take the negative back in. Since you have a finite number of shots and the cost of processing is more "real" than with digital, you tend to slow down more, think about composition more, and end up having a few number of photos, but higher quality photos rather than just blinding snapping away and getting 200 photos from a DSLR in a matter of minutes. That makes sorting through everything easier, which saves yet more time!

From what I've been reading on the newer Nikons like the D300, D3, and presumably the coming D90 they have all of these "adaptive dynamic range" features in them now that prevent the blown highlights and ugly color shifts while also preventing things from dopping down into the shadow gutter. But geez, why pay thousands of dollars for all that when FILM has been able to handle this far better all along? If you live in a small town and don't have a reputable film processor nearby then that's certainly a consideration, but Costco is conveniently halfway between work and home for me and easy to swing by at lunch or on the way home, so I'm loving film big time. I'll still be shooting digital when I need to, but will be shooting film when I can.
SteVTEC is offline   Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Old July 1st, 2008, 01:57 PM   #2
Destroyer of Tires
 
Doctor_X's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: OC and IE California
Posts: 16,094
Film is good stuff. I learned all my photo stuff on film.





That's my main squeeze... My work horse.



And this is the backup. I never use it though because the meter sucks ass and I just like the simplicity of my FM2.



Doctor_X is offline   Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old July 1st, 2008, 02:07 PM   #3
Registered User
 
chiefy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2001
Location: Florida
Posts: 4,602
Send a message via AIM to chiefy
awesome pics steve. damn kevin ur hardcore..
chiefy is offline   Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old July 1st, 2008, 02:19 PM   #4
Destroyer of Tires
 
Doctor_X's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: OC and IE California
Posts: 16,094
Haha naw there are kids way more hardcore than I am. Some of the people I went to high school with are like whoa... LOL.

The funny thing is that I started taking photography in high school as a way to get an easy A and an art credit... and then I figured out I really enjoyed it and I basically completed every single photo class my school offered haha. Photo 1, Photo 2, Photography as Art, and Advanced Photo.



Doctor_X is offline   Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old July 1st, 2008, 07:03 PM   #5
"Certified Hybrid Killer"
 
SteVTEC's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2001
Location: Commietown, MD
Posts: 5,056
Quote:
Originally Posted by Doctor_X View Post
Film is good stuff. I learned all my photo stuff on film.

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedi...d8/Nikon_FM2_;)

http://i20.photobucket.com/albums/b2...ras1resize.jpg
That's my main squeeze... My work horse.

http://www.nikongear.com/nef/gearimages/Nikon_F3.jpg

And this is the backup. I never use it though because the meter sucks ass and I just like the simplicity of my FM2.


So who else here shoots film now besides Kevin and I? Nobody? Do you still shoot these guys frequently or do you use the D300 more now?
SteVTEC is offline   Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old July 1st, 2008, 07:23 PM   #6
Destroyer of Tires
 
Doctor_X's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: OC and IE California
Posts: 16,094
Well I've been shooting a lot more with my D300 but I still use my film stuff. The reason why I shoot film less is because whenever I do shoot it, I like to process it and print it myself (meaning access to a darkroom). Basically whenever my old photo teacher opens up the lab, I'm there. So I'll try and bring a couple rolls to utilize the event haha.

Digital is very convenient but it's a little difficult to replicate the effects that film gives your photos.



Doctor_X is offline   Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old July 2nd, 2008, 02:02 PM   #7
The name is Scott. D:
 
Whumbachumba's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: Texas
Posts: 979
Send a message via AIM to Whumbachumba Send a message via MSN to Whumbachumba Send a message via Yahoo to Whumbachumba
I occasionally shoot film. I've put my film camera back into my bag, so I can use it whenever I go out now. It's hard to find lenses for my camera though. Yashica bayonet mounts ftl.

I really do like them though. I like being able to open up the aperture all the way to F1.9 on my 50mm and shoot like there is no tomorrow. My 135mm and 28mm are both F2.8 lenses and are also really fun to use.


Full gear


My main camera


Back up, full auto body with broken lens. Something is wrong with the aperture. I might take it apart just to take apart...again


Couple more lenses and the teleconverter


Lens and the good 'ol Holga. That camera gets you thinking and takes fun pictures, multiple exposures on one frame of film is awesome too.
Whumbachumba is offline   Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old July 2nd, 2008, 02:11 PM   #8
"Certified Hybrid Killer"
 
SteVTEC's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2001
Location: Commietown, MD
Posts: 5,056
Quote:
Originally Posted by Doctor_X View Post
Well I've been shooting a lot more with my D300 but I still use my film stuff. The reason why I shoot film less is because whenever I do shoot it, I like to process it and print it myself (meaning access to a darkroom). Basically whenever my old photo teacher opens up the lab, I'm there. So I'll try and bring a couple rolls to utilize the event haha.

Digital is very convenient but it's a little difficult to replicate the effects that film gives your photos.
Yeah I took completely for granted how nicely and naturally film can handle harsh lighting conditions and extremely contrasty scenes. The natural look that film gives me on some shots with challenging light makes my DSLRs look like cheap point and shoots.

I can't see myself ever doing my own film processing, even though I know it's pretty easy to DIY. Why bother when I can get it done at Costco with a set of 5x7" prints and a completely usable 6MP scan for 8 bucks in only an hour! Since I don't need prints for everything I could get them without prints and just go with the scans for even less. Still gotta find where to get some E6 slide film processed. I shot a roll of Fuji Veliva 50 (the new stuff) at the beach this past weekend.

Now the question is what the heck do I do with my TWO DSLRs. I already didn't really need two bodies, and now I have three! And what do I do with some of my lenses which are DX only? I think I'm going to do most of my personal shooting (family, vacation, scenic stuff, etc) on film and leave one of my digitals for other stuff, or if I just need faster/cheaper results (event shooting).
SteVTEC is offline   Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old July 2nd, 2008, 02:32 PM   #9
Destroyer of Tires
 
Doctor_X's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: OC and IE California
Posts: 16,094
Oh jeez Wumba you have a Holga?! That's funny haha. Coolest (and cheapest) medium format eva.

Steve - Processing the film yourself gives you control over it because you can over process it if your film is underexposed (pushing stops) etc. It's just more control in your hands, plus it's part of the dark room experience lol. Printing is fun and you get the results you want.

What to do... You have the 10.5mm right? If you don't know what to do with that DX lens... Give it to me!



Doctor_X is offline   Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old July 2nd, 2008, 02:35 PM   #10
The name is Scott. D:
 
Whumbachumba's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: Texas
Posts: 979
Send a message via AIM to Whumbachumba Send a message via MSN to Whumbachumba Send a message via Yahoo to Whumbachumba
The Holga is quite an interesting camera. We actually had an assignment in one of my photography classes in which we had to use it. It was pretty fun. Great little artsy camera, especially for Lomography.
Whumbachumba is offline   Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old July 2nd, 2008, 02:41 PM   #11
Destroyer of Tires
 
Doctor_X's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: OC and IE California
Posts: 16,094
So I've heard. A few of my friends have them and they get pretty crazy looking photos.



Doctor_X is offline   Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old July 2nd, 2008, 02:42 PM   #12
The name is Scott. D:
 
Whumbachumba's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: Texas
Posts: 979
Send a message via AIM to Whumbachumba Send a message via MSN to Whumbachumba Send a message via Yahoo to Whumbachumba
You should pick one up. They are only like $25 or so. The film gets expensive though.
Whumbachumba is offline   Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old July 2nd, 2008, 02:43 PM   #13
"Certified Hybrid Killer"
 
SteVTEC's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2001
Location: Commietown, MD
Posts: 5,056
Quote:
Originally Posted by Doctor_X View Post
Steve - Processing the film yourself gives you control over it because you can over process it if your film is underexposed (pushing stops) etc. It's just more control in your hands, plus it's part of the dark room experience lol. Printing is fun and you get the results you want.

What to do... You have the 10.5mm right? If you don't know what to do with that DX lens... Give it to me!
My current DX Nikkor inventory is:

- 10.5
- 17-55 f/2.8
- 18-55VR
- 18-135

The 10.5 is too fun, and works great at events:

Warning: Digital photo, lol.


The 18-135 is also a great outdoor daylight lens for event type stuff too where I'm shooting a lot and am gonna prefer digital anyways. And the 18-55VR I got so stupidly cheap that I might as well just keep it. The VR is great for travel and walkaround type photography in any sort of light.

The one I'm not too sure about now is the 17-55 f/2.8.


Oh I also have the new Tokina 11-16 f/2.8 which is also "DX". But that covers the full frame from 15-16mm, and is also an f/2.8 lens. Not gonna beat that short of going with the stupidly expensive and heavy Nikkor 14-24 f/2.8. Their 17-35 f/2.8 isn't as wide as this Tokina, and the 18-35 is even less slow and has a slower aperture. I might pick one of those up just to play with though, an 18-35. Only $300 or even less used.
SteVTEC is offline   Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old July 2nd, 2008, 02:48 PM   #14
Destroyer of Tires
 
Doctor_X's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: OC and IE California
Posts: 16,094
Yeah I've got the 18-135 and it's a pretty nice walk around lens but it's got some crazy distortion lol.

I want that fisheye! Agh!



Doctor_X is offline   Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old July 2nd, 2008, 04:11 PM   #15
"Certified Hybrid Killer"
 
SteVTEC's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2001
Location: Commietown, MD
Posts: 5,056
I like how the 18-135 goes from wild barrel to wild pincushion and then back to barrel again all within a few mm at the wide end!
SteVTEC is offline   Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old July 2nd, 2008, 05:10 PM   #16
"Certified Hybrid Killer"
 
SteVTEC's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2001
Location: Commietown, MD
Posts: 5,056
Quote:
Originally Posted by Whumbachumba View Post
I occasionally shoot film. I've put my film camera back into my bag, so I can use it whenever I go out now. It's hard to find lenses for my camera though. Yashica bayonet mounts ftl.

I really do like them though. I like being able to open up the aperture all the way to F1.9 on my 50mm and shoot like there is no tomorrow. My 135mm and 28mm are both F2.8 lenses and are also really fun to use.

http://img384.imageshack.us/img384/376/90823661sp8.jpg
Full gear

http://img95.imageshack.us/img95/438/87167631yw5.jpg
My main camera

http://img384.imageshack.us/img384/3820/97857219po9.jpg[/img]
Back up, full auto body with broken lens. Something is wrong with the aperture. I might take it apart just to take apart...again

http://img370.imageshack.us/img370/1426/81734323hu8.jpg
Couple more lenses and the teleconverter

http://img384.imageshack.us/img384/5275/45920528ym4.jpg
Lens and the good 'ol Holga. That camera gets you thinking and takes fun pictures, multiple exposures on one frame of film is awesome too.
Hey neat a Holga! Stupid work. I couldn't see any of the photos bc of the firewall. Post some photos from the Holga.
SteVTEC is offline   Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old July 2nd, 2008, 05:29 PM   #17
The name is Scott. D:
 
Whumbachumba's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: Texas
Posts: 979
Send a message via AIM to Whumbachumba Send a message via MSN to Whumbachumba Send a message via Yahoo to Whumbachumba
I'll have to find some that I still have. Don't have a scanner, so they are going to be pictures of pictures...
Whumbachumba is offline   Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old July 5th, 2008, 10:58 AM   #18
"Certified Hybrid Killer"
 
SteVTEC's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2001
Location: Commietown, MD
Posts: 5,056
Bumpity.

No other film shooters here? Just the three of us? Sounds about right.
SteVTEC is offline   Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old March 29th, 2010, 06:51 PM   #19
"Certified Hybrid Killer"
 
SteVTEC's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2001
Location: Commietown, MD
Posts: 5,056
SteVTEC is offline   Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old March 29th, 2010, 07:11 PM   #20
Destroyer of Tires
 
Doctor_X's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: OC and IE California
Posts: 16,094
Got a roll of some film I need to have developed. Excited to see what's on it! LOL



Doctor_X is offline   Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old March 29th, 2010, 07:46 PM   #21
"Certified Hybrid Killer"
 
SteVTEC's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2001
Location: Commietown, MD
Posts: 5,056
Man I shot so much film last year and never posted a single shot in this thread.
SteVTEC is offline   Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old March 31st, 2010, 10:35 AM   #22
"Certified Hybrid Killer"
 
SteVTEC's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2001
Location: Commietown, MD
Posts: 5,056
Just shot a test roll of Fuji 200 color neg film through my N80 up and down the industrial park drive here. Shot some 'early spring' photos with the AF 60mm f/2.8 non-D Micro. The N80 seems to be operating just fine, but I noticed that the exposure compensation control didn't really seem to be doing anything with the exposure. Will have to dig out the manual then. I'm guessing a custom setting is probably off from the way I'd want it is all.

Up tomorrow - the F100 shooting generally the same stuff, with the same film. Want to make sure both are in tip-top working order before putting some nicer film through them. Gonna shoot Velvia 50 this weekend hopefully with the cherry blossoms, and I've decided to take both film cameras with me and shoot pretty much exclusively film on vacation to the far east in mid-May.
SteVTEC is offline   Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old March 31st, 2010, 02:32 PM   #23
t|23v0|2 n00b t00n3|2
 
Trevendous03's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: Columbus, Ohio
Posts: 3,572
I can now join the ranks of the elite, but I only paid $200 for mine ...


Idk if I wanna get the battery grip or not... do you like the grip, Steve?
Trevendous03 is offline   Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old March 31st, 2010, 06:36 PM   #24
"Certified Hybrid Killer"
 
SteVTEC's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2001
Location: Commietown, MD
Posts: 5,056
I actually like the grip for the F100 because it's low-profile and only holds AA batteries. Definitely worth owning if you own heavy lenses, or might blow through 20-30 rolls in a shoot (wedding). A slightly easier option though is just an extra MS-12 internal battery magazine in your pocket, pre-loaded with another set of AA's.

The F100 with grip handles beautifully with an 80-200/2.8 class lens. The new digital grips are way too friggin tall because they take the single or dual EN-EL3e batteries too, which are too fat. Makes the camera too tall and difficult to fit into a lot of camera bags. I'd buy a grip for the D200 or D90 if they made a low-profile AA-only one, but they're not doing that these days.
SteVTEC is offline   Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old April 1st, 2010, 08:31 AM   #25
"Certified Hybrid Killer"
 
SteVTEC's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2001
Location: Commietown, MD
Posts: 5,056
Finished the roll in the F100 this morning. Will drop off both rolls at Costco during lunch today and then pickup tomorrow on the way home.
SteVTEC is offline   Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old April 1st, 2010, 08:38 AM   #26
t|23v0|2 n00b t00n3|2
 
Trevendous03's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: Columbus, Ohio
Posts: 3,572
Quote:
Originally Posted by SteVTEC View Post
I actually like the grip for the F100 because it's low-profile and only holds AA batteries. Definitely worth owning if you own heavy lenses, or might blow through 20-30 rolls in a shoot (wedding). A slightly easier option though is just an extra MS-12 internal battery magazine in your pocket, pre-loaded with another set of AA's.

The F100 with grip handles beautifully with an 80-200/2.8 class lens. The new digital grips are way too friggin tall because they take the single or dual EN-EL3e batteries too, which are too fat. Makes the camera too tall and difficult to fit into a lot of camera bags. I'd buy a grip for the D200 or D90 if they made a low-profile AA-only one, but they're not doing that these days.
I do have that 180mm f/2.8 which is not uber heavy, but it is pretty big. I'm thinking about eventually getting a 80-200 f/2.8, so it will probably be worth me getting the grip for the F100. I love my D200 without the grip though, you're right about digital grips. I have a grip for the D90, and it makes that thing very very tall. It still fits in my Lowepro Slingshot but barely.
Trevendous03 is offline   Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old April 1st, 2010, 09:34 AM   #27
"Certified Hybrid Killer"
 
SteVTEC's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2001
Location: Commietown, MD
Posts: 5,056
An 80-200/2.8 is in a different league weight and handling wise vs a 180/2.8. The 180 is similar in size and weight to the 70-300VR which is no problem. If you shoot with an 80-200/2.8 class lens ALL the time though, the battery grip is definitely worth it not just for the better handling but because of additional power capacity. Driving a big lens with the high-torque screwdriver motor or big AF-S motors sucks a whole lot of power, which the camera needs for film advance and rewind and other stuff that a DSLR doesn't need to handle. Shooting with the 70-200VR on my D40, it was funny how quickly the little battery in that thing went dead.
SteVTEC is offline   Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old April 1st, 2010, 09:40 AM   #28
"Certified Hybrid Killer"
 
SteVTEC's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2001
Location: Commietown, MD
Posts: 5,056
Taking a serious look at Provia 400X: http://www.adorama.com/FJRXP36.html#ProductReviews

Gets very good reviews on Adorama, and some people whose work I respect and admire at NikonCafe have given it a very positive review too, so I think I might try some of this stuff. Ken reviewed it and his review correlates with what I've seen elsewhere, that it's quite good.

It always seems like whatever I'm shooting is never holding still no matter if it's landscapes (wind blowing through blades of grass or cherry blossoms) or my kids running around, so shooting ASA 50/100 speed films is quite a challenge unless it's broad daylight, and that's with f/2.8 or faster lenses. The 400X Provia is supposed to be very fine grained and hardly any worse than the 100F, while still giving you nice color saturation and contrast, but not as wild as Velvia 50. Might be perfect for my trip with mixed lighting and subjects to shoot.
SteVTEC is offline   Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old April 1st, 2010, 03:48 PM   #29
"Certified Hybrid Killer"
 
SteVTEC's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2001
Location: Commietown, MD
Posts: 5,056
Couldn't wait to pick up my scans so I swung by costco again today on the way home. The streak of ridiculously inconsistent Costco processing continues. Last time there was severe scanning issues, which they corrected. There were blue and red looking squiggly lines going through each scan which completely destroyed the scans, and they refused to fix it saying it was on the negative. Clearly it was NOT on the negatives nor the prints so it was just the scanning. I had to get a bit LOUD to convince them they should just redo the scans. This time the scan quality is fine minus some random cleanliness issues, but the nice 3000x2000 6MP scans have been downgraded all the way to 1940x1287 which is a whopping 2.5MP. I'd go back and complain and have them give me full-res scans, but these are really only test shots and there's nothing all that fancy here anyways. Penn Camera has gotten reasonably competitive with film processing here and it's a pro shop, so I guess I'll give them a try next. I might get a scanner at home just so that if whomever hoses up a batch or a scan went bad I can rescan myself, except finding a scanner that works decent these days and on MacOSX is a big PITA.

N80 and 60mm f/2.8 non-D micro. I love how you can get super bright and vibrant photos on film with completely natural looking tone curves. You can't do this on digital without it looking weird with ugly channel clipping, or if you can it's not nearly as easy.




F100 test shot, and I think my 135mm f/2.8 AIS. Slight levels adjustment on the scan but otherwise colors are as shot.




Get good scans and film looks niiiiiiiice.
SteVTEC is offline   Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old April 8th, 2010, 01:59 PM   #30
t|23v0|2 n00b t00n3|2
 
Trevendous03's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: Columbus, Ohio
Posts: 3,572
Which B&W film is the best for low light with the least amount of grain?

1. Fuji Neopan 1600
2. Ilford Delta 3200
3. Ilford HP5 Plus 400
4. Kodak Tri-X 400
5. Kodak T-Max 3200

From what I've seen, the 3200 films look extremely grainy. I'm considering the Fuji... example: http://www.flickr.com/photos/joelaron/484767764/

It looks a tad grainy, but it's very fine grain it seems like. I've also heard of pushing this http://www.adorama.com/FJNP40036.html to ISO 1600.
Trevendous03 is offline   Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Reply


Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now

In order to be able to post messages on the Honda Accord Forum : V6 Performance Accord Forums forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.
User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.
Password:
Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.
Email Address:
Chapter
Choose your AV6 Chapter Location
Ride
What do you drive?
Insurance
Please select your insurance company (Optional)

Log-in


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On