Accord V6 Forum banner
1 - 15 of 15 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
77 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Ok, electronics wizards, I need your help...

I converted all my exterior lights to LED. I am experiencing Hyperflash with my turnsignals. I can get a universal load resistor to tap into my system to fake the load to slow down the flash pulses. My question is this, the resistors I can get are 50watt, 6Ohm Aluminum Body, wire wound resistors, will these be enough to take the place of the incandescent bulbs, or do I need to do something else???

The stock signal filaments are rated at, 27watts for the front, and 21watts for the rears.

Is the watt rating of the resistor the only thing I need to worry about??? 27w + 18w = 45 watts, so is this 50watt ok??? To be honest, I really have no idea what any of this crap means, so someone please help me...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
77 Posts
Discussion Starter · #2 · (Edited)
Ok, i have just finished educating myself on this topic, I no longer need help. There is a simple way to find out all of this. Simply put, if you want to find out what your stock bulbs ampere rating is, on the front signals, the output is 27 watts. We know it is in a 12 volt system, so we use the formula as follows

volts x amps = watts
12V x amps = 27watts

Divide by 12V

amps = 2.25

Then, to figure out what Ohm load you need to replace that 2.25 amp load, you use this formula:

Current in Amps = the square root of Watts/Ohms

Amps = square root of 50 watts/10 Ohms (rating of an aluminum body wrie wound resistor from NTE electronics)

Amps = square root of 8.33333333333
Amps = 2.236+/-

Almost a perfect swap...the LED bulb I am using for my front signal pulls 82 milliamps (.082amps), so add that to the resistors amp load...

2.236amps + .082 amps = 2.318 [email protected]

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Our rear signals have a wattage output of 21 watts

12Volts x amps = 21 watts

divide by 12V

Amps = 1.75

The LEDs I put in have an output of 60 Milliamps (.060amps), so now we need to find a DC type load resistor that has an amp output of 1.15 amps (1.75amps - .060amps)

The 50 watt, 40 Ohm resistor pulls a 1.1180 amp current (figured from the formula above), so it will work nicely


God Dammit, i'm soo [email protected]&king smart!!!
 

·
registered n00b
Joined
·
2,769 Posts
playing those calculation games dont always work out, because there may be a variety of factors that you have not taken into account. for instance: electric potential (voltage) varies between when the car is on, and when the car is off. also, its not quite 12v. closer to something like 13.5 when the car is on, and 12.7 when the car is off. also, keep in mind that the bulb is not the only thing that induces resistance to the circuit.

so here's my proposal. take out the relay/flasher unit from the in-cabin fuse box. remove the little black housing, and identify the largest resistor on the circuit board. remove the resistor, and solder on wires which lead to a 100kohm variable resistor (potentiometer), available from radio shack for under $3. put it all back together, and when youre done, u can even vary the blinker speed. im planning to do this soon, maybe i can throw up another diy if i can do a clean job.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
77 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Ok, you can do that DIY for us, but will that work, since the 03+ Accords have no load electronic modules, there are no thermal flashers??? You do a clean install, and I will pay you to build a set of variable rate flashers for me, how does that sound???
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
77 Posts
Discussion Starter · #8 · (Edited)
Mine too!!!


Ok, so @13.8Volts, the bulbs create less amperage.

the 27 watt bulb draws 1.9565 amps @13.8V, the 6ohm resistor creates 2.236 amperes + the .082 amperes of the LED bulb, making a total of 2.318 amperes, a diference of .3615 amperes, not too far off, I dont think this will make a difference with flasher pulse width


the 21 watt bulb draws 1.5217 amperes @13.8V... with a 6ohm resistor(2.236) and the LED light (0.60 amperes), totalling 2.2960 amperes, that makes the difference 0.7743 amperes, not too shabby either
 

·
registered n00b
Joined
·
2,769 Posts
okay here's the deal.

earlier today i cracked open a relay/flasher unit from a 2nd gen TL, and also one from mine (05 L4 LX 5mt). both of these units use Surface Mount Technology (SMT) resistors now, instead of the conventional through-hole resistors we're used to seeing.

so, unlike doing a variable blinker speed project on older hondas, soldering/desoldering components to/from these circuit boards are now unpractical. here's what my flasher unit looks like:




so here's the new game plan: instead of tampering with the flasher's circuits, we alter the load on the actual blinker circuit instead.

hardwire a, say 100ohm, resistor in series with a blinker, and in addition, wire a 100kohm potentiometer in parallel. at its maximum resitance, your blinkers would blink slower than stock, regardless of what type of bulbs youre running. at lesser resistance, your blinkers would flash like a crazy martha focker.

regarding selling this setup, even if i were to make a setup for you guys, over half of the work would still remain in installing the hardware. but ill probably throw up a diy soon for all you diy'ers out there.
 

·
Fast at Last!... kind of.
Joined
·
2,163 Posts
If you do decide to use the 6ohm resistor, do we simply put that resistor in series to the cathode lead of the LED? Or do we run the resistor and LED in parallel to each other?
 

·
registered n00b
Joined
·
2,769 Posts
that flasher unit will only work on older cars, most definitely not anything honda has made in the past few years. i posted a pic of the flasher in our cars up above, so the link to that 3pin flasher most definitely wont be a direct replacement. the only solution to fix hyperblinking is to find a load resistor. your only other option is to replace those surface-mount resistors inside the flasher, but i personally think its too difficult to be worth your time.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1 Posts
Ok, i have just finished educating myself on this topic, I no longer need help. There is a simple way to find out all of this. Simply put, if you want to find out what your stock bulbs ampere rating is, on the front signals, the output is 27 watts. We know it is in a 12 volt system, so we use the formula as follows

volts x amps = watts
12V x amps = 27watts

Divide by 12V

amps = 2.25

Then, to figure out what Ohm load you need to replace that 2.25 amp load, you use this formula:

Current in Amps = the square root of Watts/Ohms

Amps = square root of 50 watts/10 Ohms (rating of an aluminum body wrie wound resistor from NTE electronics)

Amps = square root of 8.33333333333
Amps = 2.236+/-

Almost a perfect swap...the LED bulb I am using for my front signal pulls 82 milliamps (.082amps), so add that to the resistors amp load...

2.236amps + .082 amps = 2.318 [email protected]

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Our rear signals have a wattage output of 21 watts

12Volts x amps = 21 watts

divide by 12V

Amps = 1.75

The LEDs I put in have an output of 60 Milliamps (.060amps), so now we need to find a DC type load resistor that has an amp output of 1.15 amps (1.75amps - .060amps)

The 50 watt, 40 Ohm resistor pulls a 1.1180 amp current (figured from the formula above), so it will work nicely


God Dammit, i'm soo [email protected]&king smart!!!
I am having this problem right now. My car is a 2017 Honda Accord Touring. I replaced the stock touring headlight with custom touring ones that change colors and stuff. I have tried resistors, but it does nothing, yet they get hot as hell. Im tearing my hair out. The headlights work normally, but the mirror, cabin and rear indicators all hyperflash. How do i fix this?
 
1 - 15 of 15 Posts
Top