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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
EDIT: I found a spot where I definitely may have confused some folks: this should clear it up. The transmission range switch plugs into a harness and the wire colors on the switch wires change from the wire colors on the harness it plugs into. BOTH sets of wire colors are now listed. Only a couple of wire colors change, but the changes REALLY MATTER!!!

For quite some time I've been wanting to do a write up on my 6 speed manual swap but I needed moar posts! Now I have the posts, a J35 engine on top of the 6 speed manual (finally), and you can have my experience. I also found the edit button and am actively cleaning up this post :)

TL;DR..... here's the full playlist.

ATC6 swap:
2000 Honda Accord EX V6 6-speed Manual Swap

J35 swap:
2000 Honda Accord J35/6 speed manual swap

Let's say this together: "I don't need a Richie Harness" and "I don't need a Richie module"
All of those posts I think are what have deterred everyone from attempting this swap for so very long. This car, this 6th gen Accord, is no different than an old Civic or Integra of the same period and is QUITE swappable. If you want plug & play with minimal effort, THIS is the way to go. If you want to go with the later model J35 engines, that is on YOU. You'll want to wire in a later model ECU and get yourself some Hondata or Flashpro gadgets; I don't have Hondata or Flashpro money, so I found a fairly plug & play solution.


Step 1: Make sure you can find the transmission.

The Accord 6 speed manual is well within the reach of the average swapper, but the transmissions are somewhat rare- although they do show up on eBay from time to time. I've seen one in the wild in a junkyard... almost bought the whole car! I used the ATC6 (Accord 6 speed manual) but you could also go with the old CLS transmission (2003-ish Acura CL Sport, has LSD and super rare); the install is probably no different.


Step 2: Make sure you have a daily driver besides the swap car!

This could take a single weekend, or it could take a month. I don't know what your skill level is, so I recommend making sure you have a ride to school/work/doctor etc.


Step 3: Swap your 6th gen Accord.

Now, some details.

I've been reading for a while that our 6th gen's can't use the 6 speed manual without some blah blah swap harness... this is NOT true. Say it with me... "I don't need a Richie module, I don't need a Richie harness". I'll say it again- You don't need a swap harness. You need the following:

Qty- Item

1- ATC6 or CLS transmission
2- Dakota Digital speed signal converters (SGI-5E)
1- 2003-2007 shift cables set
1- 2003-2007 shifter
2- 2003 Acura CLS lower transmission mounts
1- 2003 Acura CLS lower trans mounting beam
1- Underhood relay, both NO and NC contacts (I used an old Toyota relay)
6- High wattage resistors (you should measure the solenoids yourself- I promise it will work better)
1- Multimeter capable of measuring resistance (the omega symbol)
##- A decent metric tool set
1- engine hoist or "cherry picker" as seen in my videos
1- OBDII scantool of your choice: I recommend a bluetooth ELM 327 type... WAY FASTER, MOAR CHEAPER
...and some other stuff listed below. If you want to do the wiring stuff nice, get some good crimp connectors, or test your soldering skills along with some good shrink tubing. Get fancy, take pics and video...
let's make my rolling dumpster the worst example!!!


I was able to do the transmission swap using my stock J30 ECU and engine; and when I did the J35 swap, the stock '99 J35 ECU. Benefits of keeping your J30 engine/ECU:
-No extra engine wiring (at all)
-Keep your existing key

If you are just doing the transmission swap, you only need to fool the ECU... if you even care about a CEL or check engine light. The way I did this convinces the stock ECU that the car is still an automatic, and keeps you from popping any check engine lights... for those of us that need to pass state inspections. I can tell you where to put stuff, it's on you to make it look clean.

The transmission bolts right up, no question. Keep your axles unless they are old & trashed. Keep your existing engine mounting brackets, front, rear and right side (by the power steering pump). YES, YES, YES, the automatic, stock, J30A1 front, rear and right side mounts AND mounting brackets work for this swap.

__
The swap WILL NOT WORK without that CLS lower transmission mount; it's the only one that will put this thing into our chassis.
__

Pulling the engine and transmission together is the easiest way; any other way results in much cussing and grief. Get yourself a harbor freight cherry picker and pull the whole drivetrain! It comes right out of the top, no need to drop the subframe. If you've ever done an old 90's Civic or Integra, it's no different than that.

You'll need an appropriate clutch and flywheel; I used the LuK 08-047. It works VERY well! For the flywheel, I used 22100-RCA-006 stock 2007 Accord clutch (V6/6 speed). You'll need some matching clutch bolts 90011-PGE-000 to hold it on (8 of them), as well as pressure plate bolts 90034-PRC-000 (6 of them I believe). You cannot use your automatic starter, you need the manual transmission starter 31200-RCA-A02, these show up on eBay from time to time. Go ahead and throw away that flex plate when you're finished swapping!

Bolt the 6 speed right up to the engine using your existing engine to trans bolts, I believe they all fit. If not, you may either order them online or visit home depot, lowes, etc. and pick through their limited selection of metric bolts, but I can't remember if they have ones long enough for this application.

Again, go ahead and keep your floppy old vacuum engine mounts, or get some new ones... OR get some polyurethane mounts! I used the stock vacuum mounts for the ATC6 (6 speed manual) swap and went with Innovative Mounts for the J35 I did a few months later. Either way, be sure you have the CLS mounts 50805-S3M-A03 and 50806-S3M-A03, and the mounting beam 50809-S3M-A00 along with flange bolts 95701-10085-08 to hold the rubber mounts to the beam and bolts 95701-10035-08 (3 of them) to hold the beam onto the transmission. Reuse the nuts that hold the mounts to the subframe.

You'll need a set of shifter cables 54310-SDP-L02, I would recommend new unless you find a GOOD set of used ones. I also used the '06 shifter instead of the 6th gen; if you use the 6th gen you have to change the mounting point on the shift arm on the transmission itself (there's two places). Otherwise your gears 1-3-5 are on the bottom and 2-4-6 are on top! The shifter has two bolt holes that line up; the other two you can simply drill down and bolt right into the drill holes (see video) like I did. By the way, the '06 shifter is a MUCH shorter throw than the 6th gen shifter (that one shifts like an old truck).
2000 Honda Accord EX V6 6-speed manual swap part 10- '06 shifter installed

All of the parts install very straightforward. The real work lies in tricking the ECU into doing its job! I obtained speed signals to verify what setting on the primary SGI-5E I would use; our cars' transmission has positions 1 and 2, and D3 and D4. Turns out the Accord and Odyssey ECU's look for the same ratios; I think the Odyssey used the same exact transmission as the Accord with maybe a different final drive or something. Mainshaft to Countershaft ratios seem to be the same. You will be using 1 or 2 ONLY as selecting this tells the ECU not to ever shift. Why? because you want to maintain a constant mainshaft to countershaft ratio. Otherwise, you pop a CEL for "incorrect ratio" because the ECU thinks the torque converter is slipping. Memory tells me that 1st gear ratio is 2.534:1 and 2nd is 1.503:1, and I verified this with a DMM that has a frequency metering function:
2000 Honda Accord EX V6 6-speed manual swap part 11- getting speed sensor signals
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kc8iOY_T0Gc&index=13&t=0s&list=PLzW1ZOkrQELGwIq21Rys3A1VeIgkHI05c

The Dakota Digital SGI-5E converts your speed sensor signal to something the ECU can use. Without it, no speedometer, no VTEC. I don't remember which transmission uses which sensor, I think the old BAXA automatic uses the 2-wire variable reluctance sensor, the ATC6 used a 3-wire hall effect sensor. One outputs a sine wave, one a square wave (I forget which does what). Your ECU will throw a fit and pee itself if it sees the wrong signal. I used TWO of these to eliminate the check engine light for the missing speed sensor; you only need one with a manual transmission because you don't have a torque converter. The first SGI-5E takes its signal from the countershaft speed sensor (hope I'm not remembering these backwards) and feeds the corrected signal to the ECU. Now you have a speed signal, a working speedometer, and VTEC... but your ECU thinks you have a slipping torque converter. As for calibrating, you can drive alongside a friend and do it that way, or drive around in front of those police radar trailers that also double as a scoreboard for the very young & foolish :cool:

You will use a second SGI-5E that receives a signal directly from the 1st; I used 2nd gear @ ratio multiplier of 1.5:1 on the second SGI unit- it appears that .003 of a revolution is well within the tolerance range for the ECU as I've not thrown a code for incorrect ratio. Having the second unit now feed into the mainshaft speed sensor maintains a CONSTANT correct gear ratio so you don't get a CEL for that speed sensor! The ECU has been fooled; it thinks your torque converter is operating normally. As for working the SGI-5E, it comes with instructions and I have a little clip of it in action:
2000 Honda Accord EX V6 6-speed manual swap part 15- How to fool the ECU?!

Now to fool that ECU for all those pesky shift solenoids...
Your automatic uses little solenoids to open and close valves to shift the transmission and lock/unlock the torque converter. The ECU constantly pulses these solenoids to verify that they work, in addition to USING them to shift. This is why I used 1st or 2nd gear... as per the manual, using gears 1 or 2 locks the ECU into that gear and tells the ECU to never shift. This means we can get a constant mainshaft to countershaft ratio... to avoid that CEL for Incorrect Ratio.

I found that you can use a multimeter to measure the resistance of each solenoid and purchase a corresponding resistor to give it a load... just like when your LED blinkers go turbo because you didn't use a load resistor, you need a load for the ECU to play around with so those wires from the solenoids don't throw any codes. This includes the TC lockup solenoid. Remember Ohm's law: V=IR, I=V/R, and R=V/I. This will tell you what resistance to get to fool each solenoid. Also, the resistors must be rated to handle the power (watts), so watts law says P=VI. That will tell you what wattage your resistor must be able to handle. Otherwise they act like a fuse and just blow! Algebra aside... this is super easy. Take a solenoid; set multimeter to resistance (ohm symbol, greek omega sign) and put a red lead on one side, black lead on other side, read the number. That's the resistor you need, within 1 or 2 ohms. BTW, yes, a solenoid is a coil, and coils tend to have inductive reactance... in an AC circuit. The formula for XL is 2(pi)fL or 2 X pi X frequency X inductance (measured in Henry's, you can't make this up). What's the frequency of a DC circuit? Yes- zero. So, no XL or inductive reactance. Just coil resistance. If I sound stupid, then you already knew this and are subsequently NOT the target audience :)

Now for that relay... I wired this relay DIRECTLY into the old range switch harness that went to the automatic transmission. I used a couple of extender wires to route my resistors into the air intake (before the filter) and the relay to near the left side strut tower. My relay just kind of hangs; yours should be better than this.

I used my original reverse circuit to get backup lights. I keep 2nd gear across the NC (normally closed) contacts of the relay so it stays in 2nd gear... my reverse switch now feeds power TO the relay, causing it to change states. Now the NO (normally open) contacts are closed, and the wire for reverse is on there! This was all done at the old shift harness under the hood. The relay I use can be found in abundance in any mid-90's Toyota Corolla, I use it because it is plentiful and sturdy, and very orange.
2000 Honda Accord EX V6 6-speed manual swap part 18- relay logic & wiring

Here's the wires, take notes or get a service manual:

THIS PART WAS EDITED*
Under-hood transmission range switch wires:

From the switch to its plug:

P: BLK/BLU stripe
R: WHT
N: RED
D4: YEL
D3: GRN
2: BLU
1: BRN
Starter Cut Relay: GRY
Cruise Control Unit: PNK
Ground: RED/WHT stripe
---------------------------------
From the plug, down the harness that disappears into the firewall:

P: BLK/BLU stripe
R: WHT
N: RED/BLK stripe
D4: YEL
D3: PNK
2: BLU
1: BRN
Starter Cut Relay: BLU/WHT stripe
Cruise Control Unit: LT BLU
Ground: BLK

THIS PARAGRAPH REFERENCES THE SECOND LIST OF WIRE COLORS:
Go ahead and tie BLUE and LIGHT BLUE together; you want them both grounded/active at the same time. This enables you to get cruise control working later if you choose. Red/White goes to the common terminal of your relay contacts. The two you wired together go to the NC (normally closed) contacts. This means that without ANY power, your relay sends the 2/CC pair directly to the Red/White wire and you should be in 2nd gear; verify via dash display. Don't worry about blinking D4 yet, one thing at a time!
ABOVE THIS WAS EDITED*

Your reverse switch on the manual transmission should be grounded on one side; just pick a wire. The OTHER wire will go to one of the relay's power terminals. The other relay power terminal goes to a SWITCHED positive source. This is so you don't kill your battery accidentally (hey, it could happen). When you shift the manual transmission to reverse, this CLOSES its reverse switch, passing the ground through the relay and back to positive, causing the relay to change states. Your REVERSE wire (harness, WHITE wire) is on the NO (normally open) contact. When you shift to reverse, and change relay states, the open contact is now close and REVERSE is connected to Red/White putting the ECU into reverse, verify via dash display AND backup lights. This is how I kept from further butchering my wiring harness... just use what's already there. Plus, you get cool dash lights that indicate forward or reverse gear- most Honda manual transmissions don't get that unless they are bikes like my old Goldwing :) My other Honda 6 cylinder!

Cruise control requires wiring in a switch on that clutch pedal you should've installed while the engine was out :D there's already spots on there for a switch or two. Need to wire it in series with the brake switch that goes to cruise control, this means that if either clutch or brake are depressed, you break power to the cruise module under the steering column and cruise turns off. Put that switch on the side where it is normally depressed. The other switch location on that clutch pedal is for your starter switch (if you choose, you may bypass this but don't cry when your turn your key and are propelled into a wall or parked car)


Now, about that J35A1...
It is virtually IDENTICAL to the J30A1, except for the knock sensor, and it goes to Plug C, pin 22 if my memory is correct. Also, much VTEC in this clip.
2000 Accord V6 J35A1/6 speed manual swap part 10- Runs better with a knock sensor :)

Also, using the '99 ECU I lost my coolant temp gauge :bawling: This is a big deal for me, but my bluetooth OBDII scanner and Torque app lets me read it electronically on my phone. I'm looking into an Odyssey cluster swap to remedy this, or perhaps a 2000 model ECU. I went with the '99 because its key was almost identical to mine!

I recently found that some Odyssey ECU's have an extra plug on the back... I used that one at first and found that it caused much grief. I was constantly getting weird codes like crankshaft position sensor and TDC sensor; I switched to a 2000 Odyssey ECU that only has 4 plugs. It has proven to be much better suited to this swap.

About that key..... the Odyssey ECU has the same antitheft key as the Accord, but it will almost certainly not match your ignition tumblers. I got lucky; I found a key that was ALMOST identical to mine; just had to use a dremel to grind down a spot on each side. For you, I would advise a place that can clone a key... have them cut the new key to match the old one, and FLASH it to match the new one. Just explain that your old ECU died, you got a new one, and need a key, but you don't want to swap ignition cylinders! The right walmart location can likely do this for you, or a locksmith.

For the record, I've found that it may be possible to swap the immobilizer chip in your stock J30A1 ECU over to the Odyssey ECU, with some serious research & soldering skills. That said, I'm not providing details on that due to concerns about integrity and theft deterrent systems. If you are inclined to do the research and experimentation with it, you may stumble on to the same things that I have. Otherwise, you can do what was mentioned above and get a working key and maintain a working immobilizer system... because functioning security systems are awesome :) Also, just removing the immobilizer chip not only makes your car an easy target, it also results in routine difficulty starting the car, and a perpetual check engine light for "internal circuit failure". You can also irreparably damage an ECU by messing around with a soldering iron... Accord ECU's currently retail anywhere from $100 to $600 online, sometimes more. If you've gone to the effort that I have in doing all the resistor & relay stuff, this will negate your efforts and you likely won't pass a state inspection. California folks- this write-up may not save you from a smog station, please feel free to add any additional info for states that are not swap friendly.

I'll also add that I've now used at least 4 different Odyssey ECU's and have found that some of them have 5 plugs... 4 that fit the 6th gen Accord harness, and a 5th plug on the back. That ECU proved to be VERY troublesome- I would stay away from the ones with that weird plug on the back. As for a working key, I would advise a junkyard Odyssey that has both an ECU and a key, and get both. Cut open that terrible plastic cover on the key and get the transponder out, and swap that into your key. Maybe dip it in plastidip, maybe wrap it in electrical tape, whatever... and get THAT key cloned. You now have a working immobilizer system, and you didn't have to re-key all your locks. Or, use that one, lonely key to start your car and hope you don't lose it :( Good luck with that. Bottom line... this is all so that your swap runs great, with no check engine lights, and you get to keep your key and locks, your immobilizer system and your swap credibility!

Feel free to ask questions on here or on the YT videos comments section. I just want to get real information out there; this swap is well within the reach of the average DIY Honda swapper; both the 6 speed manual AND/OR J35 swap. And please do point out any technical or grammatical errors, I pride myself on being able to make this at least halfway legit.

If you find yourself with a blinking D4 light or CEL, just use your OBDII scanner and troubleshoot ONE CODE AT A TIME. This is what I had to do. I had wires touching, wires not hooked up, etc. and had to troubleshoot for about 2 days.
 

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For quite some time I've been wanting to do a write up on this swap but I needed moar posts! Now I have the posts, and you can have my experience. I also found the edit button and am actively cleaning up this post :)

TL;DR..... here's the full playlist.

ATC6 swap:
https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLzW1ZOkrQELGwIq21Rys3A1VeIgkHI05c

J35 swap:
https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLzW1ZOkrQELFnQUtjrkXdM7KCfi7WrxJS



Step 1: Make sure you can find the transmission.

I used the ATC6 but you could also go with the old CLS transmission; the install is probably no different.


Step 2: Make sure you have a daily driver besides the swap car!

This could take a single weekend, or it could take a month. I don't know what your skill level is, so I recommend making sure you have a ride to school/work/doctor etc.


Now, some details.

I've been reading for a while that our 6th gen's can't use the 6 speed manual without some blah blah swap harness... this is NOT true. You don't need a swap harness. You need the following:

Qty Item

1- ATC6 or CLS transmission
2- Dakota Digital speed signal converters (SGI-5E)
1- 2003-2007 shift cables set
1- 2003-2007 shifter
2- 2003 Acura CLS lower transmission mounts
1- 2003 Acura CLS lower trans mounting beam
1- Underhood relay, both NO and NC contacts (I used an old Toyota relay
6- High wattage resistors (you should measure the solenoids yourself- I promise it will work better)
...and some other stuff listed below. If you want to do the wiring stuff nice, get some good crimp connectors, or test your soldering skills along with some good shrink tubing. Get fancy, take pics and video... let's make my rolling dumpster the worst example!!!


I was able to do this swap using my stock J30 ECU and when I did the J35 swap, the stock '99 J35 ECU. Benefits of keeping your J30:
-No extra engine wiring
-Keep your existing key

The transmission bolts right up, no question. Keep your axles unless they are old & trashed. Keep your existing engine mounting brackets, front, rear and right side (by the power steering pump).
The swap WILL NOT WORK without that CLS lower transmission mount; it's the only one that will put this thing into our chassis.

Pulling the engine and transmission together is the easiest way; any other way results in much cussing and grief. Get yourself a harbor freight cherry picker and pull the whole drivetrain! It comes right out of the top, no need to drop the subframe. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OWkyxg008Zk&index=3&t=0s&list=PLzW1ZOkrQELGwIq21Rys3A1VeIgkHI05c

You'll need an appropriate clutch and flywheel; I used the LuK 08-047. It works VERY well! For the flywheel, I used 22100-RCA-006 stock 2007 Accord clutch (V6/6 speed). You'll need some matching clutch bolts 90011-PGE-000 to hold it on (8 of them), as well as pressure plate bolts 90034-PRC-000 (6 of them I believe). You cannot use your automatic starter, you need the manual transmission starter 31200-RCA-A02, these show up on eBay from time to time.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3CnSeI0suH4&index=7&t=0s&list=PLzW1ZOkrQELGwIq21Rys3A1VeIgkHI05c
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=H5iaGyBoxXM&index=8&t=0s&list=PLzW1ZOkrQELGwIq21Rys3A1VeIgkHI05c

Bolt the 6 speed right up to the engine using your existing engine to trans bolts, I believe they all fit. If not, you may either order them online or visit home depot, lowes, etc. and pick through their limited selection of metric bolts, but I can't remember if they have ones long enough for this application.

Go ahead and keep your floppy old vacuum engine mounts, or get some new ones... OR get some polyurethane mounts! I used the stock vacuum mounts for the ATC6 swap and went with Innovative Mounts for the J35 I did a few months later. Either way, be sure you have the CLS mounts 50805-S3M-A03 and 50806-S3M-A03, and the mounting beam 50809-S3M-A00 along with flange bolts 95701-10085-08 to hold the rubber mounts to the beam and bolts 95701-10035-08 (3 of them) to hold the beam onto the transmission. Reuse the nuts that hold the mounts to the subframe.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LZcc684veRQ&t=0s&list=PLzW1ZOkrQELFnQUtjrkXdM7KCfi7WrxJS&index=4

You'll need a set of shifter cables 54310-SDP-L02, I would recommend new unless you find a GOOD set of used ones. I also used the '06 shifter instead of the 6th gen; if you use the 6th gen you have to change the mounting point on the shift arm on the transmission itself (there's two places). Otherwise your gears 1-3-5 are on the bottom and 2-4-6 are on top! The shifter has two bolt holes that line up; the other two you can simply drill down and bolt right into the drill holes (see video) like I did. By the way, the '06 shifter is a MUCH shorter throw than the 6th gen shifter (that one shifts like an old truck).
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=c-MTGgFOL0I&index=10&t=0s&list=PLzW1ZOkrQELGwIq21Rys3A1VeIgkHI05c
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gbupvRdvExk&t=0s&list=PLzW1ZOkrQELGwIq21Rys3A1VeIgkHI05c&index=11

All of the parts install fairly straightforward. The real work lies in tricking the ECU into doing its job! I obtained speed signals to verify what setting on the primary SGI-5E I would use; our cars' transmission has positions 1 and 2, and D3 and D4. You will be using 1 or 2 ONLY as selecting this tells the ECU not to ever shift. Why? because you want to maintain a constant mainshaft to countershaft ratio. Otherwise, you pop a CEL for "incorrect ratio" and the ECU thinks the torque converter is slipping. Memory tells me that 1st gear ratio is 2.534:1 and 2nd is 1.503:1, and I verified this with a DMM that has a frequency metering function:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fGSM-rtLRaU&index=12&t=0s&list=PLzW1ZOkrQELGwIq21Rys3A1VeIgkHI05c
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kc8iOY_T0Gc&index=13&t=0s&list=PLzW1ZOkrQELGwIq21Rys3A1VeIgkHI05c

The SGI-5E converts your speed sensor signal to something the ECU can use. Without it, no speedometer, no VTEC. The first one takes its signal from the countershaft speed sensor (hope I'm not remembering these backwards) and feeds the corrected signal to the ECU. As for calibrating, you can drive alongside a friend and do it that way, or drive around in front of those police radar trailers that also double as a scoreboard for the very young & foolish :cool:
You will use a second SGI-5E that receives a signal directly from the 1st; I used 2nd gear @ ratio multiplier of 1.5:1 on the second SGI unit- it appears that .003 of a revolution is well within the tolerance range for the ECU as I've not thrown a code for incorrect ratio. Having the second unit now feed into the mainshaft speed sensor maintains a CONSTANT correct gear ratio so you don't get a CEL for that speed sensor! As for working the SGI-5E, it comes with instructions and I have a little clip of it in action:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=c5X7n8IkCwM&index=16&t=0s&list=PLzW1ZOkrQELGwIq21Rys3A1VeIgkHI05c

Now to fool that ECU for all those pesky shift solenoids...
I found that you can use a multimeter to measure the resistance of each solenoid and purchase a corresponding resistor to give it a load... just like when your LED blinkers go turbo because you didn't use a load resistor, you need a load for the ECU to play around with so those wires from the solenoids don't throw any codes. This includes the TC lockup solenoid. Remember Ohm's law: V=IR, I=V/R, and R=V/I. This will tell you what resistance to get to fool each solenoid. Also, the resistors must be rated to handle the power (watts), so watts law says P=VI. That will tell you what wattage your resistor must be able to handle. Otherwise they act like a fuse and just blow! Algebra aside... this is super easy. Take a solenoid; set multimeter to resistance (ohm symbol, greek omega sign) and put a red lead on one side, black lead on other side, read the number. That's the resistor you need, within 1 or 2 ohms. BTW, yes, a solenoid is a coil, and coils tend to have inductive reactance... in an AC circuit. The formula for XL is 2(pi)fL or 2 X pi X frequency X inductance (measured in Henry's, you can't make this up). What's the frequency of a DC circuit? Yes- zero. So, no XL or inductive reactance. Just coil resistance. If I sound stupid, then you already knew this and are subsequently NOT the target audience :)

Now for that relay... I used my original reverse circuit to get backup lights. I keep 2nd gear across the NC (normally closed) contacts of the relay so it stays in 2nd gear... my reverse switch now feeds power TO the relay, causing it to change states. Now the NO (normally open) contacts are closed, and the wire for reverse is on there! This was all done at the old shift harness under the hood. The relay I use can be found in abundance in any mid-90's Toyota Corolla, I use it because it is plentiful and sturdy, and very orange.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=C3mCcLR_aGc&index=19&t=0s&list=PLzW1ZOkrQELGwIq21Rys3A1VeIgkHI05c

Cruise control requires wiring in a switch on that clutch pedal you should've installed while the engine was out :D there's already spots on there for a *switch* or two. Need to wire it in series with the brake switch that goes to cruise control, this means that if either clutch or brake are depressed, you break power to the cruise module under the steering column and cruise turns off. Put that switch on the side where it is normally depressed. The other switch location on that clutch pedal is for your starter switch (if you choose, you may bypass this but don't cry when your turn your key and are propelled into a wall or parked car)


Now, about that J35A1...
It is virtually IDENTICAL to the J30A1, except for the knock sensor, and it goes to Plug C, pin 22 if my memory is correct. Also, much VTEC in this clip.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3H6yGmaRpC0&list=PLzW1ZOkrQELFnQUtjrkXdM7KCfi7WrxJS&index=11&t=0s

Also, using the '99 ECU I lost my coolant temp gauge :bawling: This is a big deal for me, but my bluetooth OBDII scanner and Torque app lets me read it electronically on my phone. I'm looking into an Odyssey cluster swap to remedy this, or perhaps a 2000 model ECU. I went with the '99 because its key was almost identical to mine!

About that key..... the Odyssey ECU has the same antitheft key as the Accord, but it will almost certainly not match your ignition tumblers. I got lucky; I found a key that was ALMOST identical to mine; just had to use a dremel to grind down a spot on each side. For you, I would advise a place that can clone a key... have them cut the new key to match the old one, and FLASH it to match the new one. Just explain that your old ECU died, you got a new one, and need a key, but you don't want to swap ignition cylinders!

Feel free to ask questions on here or on the YT videos comments section. I just want to get real information out there; this swap is well within the reach of the average DIY Honda swapper; both the 6 speed manual AND/OR J35 swap. And please do point out any technical or grammatical errors, I pride myself on being able to make this at least halfway legit.
Good job bro...
 

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Please don't let all the technobabble scare you away from this swap- the transmission bolts RIGHT IN. The wiring stuff is NOT scary and I pretty much spelled out most of it. Plus, this method should eliminate any check engine lights from happening. That said, I can't clean up your wiring for you! I've been daily driving this swap for a few weeks now and not only did it pass state inspection (no check engine light!) but it's quite solid. This J35A1 and ATC6 transmission combo has manners, but will stand and deliver when prompted. It's great in traffic. I can take a freeway on-ramp, I can pass on a two lane road, and if inclined... I could get into some seriously expensive tickets! Swap responsibly folks, and share your success. Post it here, or preferably, write your own post- complete with video!!! Thanks again to all the years of posts saying it was too hard to bother with.
 

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do you have any suggestions on why the reverse lockout can be avoided after swapping a 07 v6 3.0At to a 06 3.0 v6 6 speed MT?
 

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That I am aware of, on the 7th gen the ECU handles the reverse lockout. Below some speed (like 5 or 10mph, I'm not sure) the ECU cuts power to the reverse lockout solenoid and over some speed it locks it so you don't accidentally select reverse instead of 6th. The 6th gen Accord (and 2nd gen Odyssey) ECU has no such provision for the reverse lockout solenoid so I devised a way to get it working using a couple of relays and the existing auto transmission range switch harness. The 6th gen Accord is equally happy with or without that solenoid since the ECU isn't equipped to look for it, however one must use caution when shifting from 5th to 6th... I drove mine like that for a while and I only slipped into the reverse path a couple of times when I wasn't paying attention- I never actually ground on the gears though!
 

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Update: Dakota Digital has discontinued the SGI-5E, although you may find them online from various vendors. They now offer the SGI-100BT: Universal Speedometer and Tachometer Interface. This newer unit appears to offer the same functions I used to get my swap going, as well as a few other handy features.

 

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Thank you for the reply! My husband figured it out i will ask him what he did and let you know. I know this has been trial and error experience but i can say my car runs great. After my automatic tranny went out it set for almost a year and we stumble across a 6 speed manual in shreveport at a u pull it place. Together him and I loaded the the front assembly motor tranny ect that drops with four bolts into our jeep cherokee and started the swap. Just out of curiosity what do the 3.0 motor with 6speed tranny combos run?
 

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Thank you for the reply! My husband figured it out i will ask him what he did and let you know. I know this has been trial and error experience but i can say my car runs great. After my automatic tranny went out it set for almost a year and we stumble across a 6 speed manual in shreveport at a u pull it place. Together him and I loaded the the front assembly motor tranny ect that drops with four bolts into our jeep cherokee and started the swap. Just out of curiosity what do the 3.0 motor with 6speed tranny combos run?
As for the engine/trans combo- I've never seen them for sale still bolted together, most places are going to sell those items individually.

Together him and I loaded the the front assembly motor tranny ect that drops with four bolts into our jeep cherokee and started the swap.
If you are swapping this into a non-Honda platform, please do document your progress and consider filming it to share with the world! I've seen people stuff the J-series platform into Civic's, Integra's and S2000's but never a Jeep Cherokee! I've often thought about what that engine/trans combo would act like in another vehicle. Unless you have just loaded the engine/trans into the Jeep for transport :ROFLMAO::LOL: in which case... still consider documenting & filming! There's not enough video of this kind of swap available for people to learn from or even just for entertainment. Either way, thanks for sharing your interest!
 

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As for the engine/trans combo- I've never seen them for sale still bolted together, most places are going to sell those items individually.



If you are swapping this into a non-Honda platform, please do document your progress and consider filming it to share with the world! I've seen people stuff the J-series platform into Civic's, Integra's and S2000's but never a Jeep Cherokee! I've often thought about what that engine/trans combo would act like in another vehicle. Unless you have just loaded the engine/trans into the Jeep for transport :ROFLMAO::LOL: in which case... still consider documenting & filming! There's not enough video of this kind of swap available for people to learn from or even just for entertainment. Either way, thanks for sha
Please don't let all the technobabble scare you away from this swap- the transmission bolts RIGHT IN. The wiring stuff is NOT scary and I pretty much spelled out most of it. Plus, this method should eliminate any check engine lights from happening. That said, I can't clean up your wiring for you! I've been daily driving this swap for a few weeks now and not only did it pass state inspection (no check engine light!) but it's quite solid. This J35A1 and ATC6 transmission combo has manners, but will stand and deliver when prompted. It's great in traffic. I can take a freeway on-ramp, I can pass on a two lane road, and if inclined... I could get into some seriously expensive tickets! Swap responsibly folks, and share your success. Post it here, or preferably, write your own post- complete with video!!! Thanks again to all the years of posts saying it was too hard to bother with.
I know this is an older post and I'm getting ready to do the 6 Speed swap this weekend. Is there anything you have updated or something you would do differently? Thanks in advance.
 

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Sorry for the late reply! First, let clarify the joke! Yes we loaded the front assembly combo in the back of my Jeep but it was a steal of a deal costing only $350.00. Yep I found a 6 speed combo complete front assembly for three hundred and fifty dollars. This deal also came with the complete clutch assembly (minus the Shifter Knob) and instrument cluster. This front assembly became gold once the swap was complete and the new cluster showed less the 100K.🤣🤣🤣

Now as far as my swap let me just say I have a wonderful mechanically gifted husband. This Accord jswap did come with a few cussing fits but they were so worth the frustration. We have not figured out the speed sensors so I use my phone to avoid tickets and my RPMs are still governed. So with that being said I have no doubt she will do every bit of160 on the dash when that's removed. I am no mechanic so if you have questions on swap ask and ill find out from my husband. Also, if you have figured out the speed sensors or rpm limiter please share.
 

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I've just set the motor and transmission back in the car. So far the only questions I have is the electrical. The resistors how many watts did you go with. I know some resistors don't reach their set ohm's until the wattage is met.
 

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I have the motor and transmission all in. I had the car all wired up the way the gentleman had his the first time. Car would start move just no back up lights. Watched his videos again and saw he made some changes at the very end. So I'm trying to figure out what he has going on with the reverse circuit. And now the car won't even try to roll over. There was something in his comments about a starter relay or solenoid in his comments but all the comments are gone now. Can I ask how you have yours wired?
 

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Sorry for the late reply! First, let clarify the joke! Yes we loaded the front assembly combo in the back of my Jeep but it was a steal of a deal costing only $350.00. Yep I found a 6 speed combo complete front assembly for three hundred and fifty dollars. This deal also came with the complete clutch assembly (minus the Shifter Knob) and instrument cluster. This front assembly became gold once the swap was complete and the new cluster showed less the 100K.🤣🤣🤣

Now as far as my swap let me just say I have a wonderful mechanically gifted husband. This Accord jswap did come with a few cussing fits but they were so worth the frustration. We have not figured out the speed sensors so I use my phone to avoid tickets and my RPMs are still governed. So with that being said I have no doubt she will do every bit of160 on the dash when that's removed. I am no mechanic so if you have questions on swap ask and ill find out from my husband. Also, if you have figured out the speed sensors or rpm limiter please share.
Speed sensor.... so, the one on the automatic transmission was 2 wire I believe and the one on the manual was 3 wire... I don't recall which was which but one is Hall Effect and one is Variable Reluctance. I used the Dakota Digital SGI-5E to convert that signal (sine to square wave or square to sine wave, I forget which) and to change the output frequency. It's been a long time since I did the swap now and I've since sold the car... and the SGI-5E is discontinued BUT they make a similar one with even more features so the newer one should work. Anyways, that little signal converter is what gets your speedometer working again.

Rev limiter... this is a consequence of not having a speedometer and mainshaft speed sensor. Countershaft speed sensor it the "speed sensor" that gives you a speedometer. Mainshaft speed sensor basically looks at the torque converter to see if it's slipping. I used a second SGI-5E piggy-backed off the output of the first one, and then used the gear ratio for my chosen gear as the multiplier. I believe that 1st gear ratio is 2.534:1 and 2nd gear is 1.503:1 so the multiplier for 1st would be 2.53 and 2nd is 1.50 that couple-of-thousandths-of-a-revolution seems to be well within the ECU's tolerance and never threw a code.

Rather than pasting link after link, I'll just drop in my playlist for this swap:

That's for the manual transmission swap. I also did a playlist on my J35 swap after that:

I'm not on this forum actively but I do check in occasionally. For a while I was using my YouTube channel to reach out directly to other people that were doing their own swaps but I got a spike in trolls in the comments so I had to disable comments :( Anyway, hope this helps!
 

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I have the motor and transmission all in. I had the car all wired up the way the gentleman had his the first time. Car would start move just no back up lights. Watched his videos again and saw he made some changes at the very end. So I'm trying to figure out what he has going on with the reverse circuit. And now the car won't even try to roll over. There was something in his comments about a starter relay or solenoid in his comments but all the comments are gone now. Can I ask how you have yours wired?
Hello, you may be the person that reached out on YouTube :) Here's a quick copy/paste of my reply there:

"If your car is 1998-1999, I don't know if my technique works with that ECU, those are distributor ignition and I've never tried it on one. As for not starting, my advice is to make sure the old transmission range switch is plugged in, route it up and near the left fender for easy access. From there, "shift" the ECU into Park or Neutral, then try to start the car. Make sure the shift indicator in the dash shows P or N selected. If it starts in Park or Neutral, then you missed the starter cut relay in the driver's side (USDM) fuse panel in the dash, it's the little panel on the side of the dash that comes off and has fuses under it. That relay either needs to be bypassed, or tied into the clutch pedal switch like I did.

If the car still does not start with the range switch in P or N, I would advise checking normal no-start items like spark, fuel and a quick look at your fuses. Also, make sure your security isn't the issue- the little blinking key light in the dash should go out. If it stays blinking, your key is not being seen by the receiver in the steering column or you may have an open wire in that circuit going to the ECU.

As for the person that reached out with a no-start swap, he only said that he eventually got the car running... he never said how. That seems to be the trend with the 6th gen Accord- the people that make the breakthroughs and awesome workarounds seem to never share with the world, and the few people interested in this car and its swaps get left behind.

Comments are gone now..... yeah.... I learned back in 2006 just how bad some people can be online, especially as it pertains to Honda stuff. In the last 2 months, I've seen a lot of trolling on my channel, I'll leave it at that. It sucks not being able to reach out and help folks like yourself but I don't want the comments on my videos to devolve into an extension of the stuff that happens on forums 🤮. I hope that even without comments, the videos have enough info to get a motivated individual where they need to be. Don't think of it as a step-by-step, it's definitely NOT that 🤣😆 if you can get your hands on a Haynes or Chilton (or Helm Inc. if you have the money!) and if you have a decent grasp of car wiring diagrams, you'll get it going. Be sure to have a code scanner on hand- pending faults won't light up the check engine light. I'll leave this up for a day or two, hope it gets to you before I take down comments on this video too! Good luck with your swap. Consider making a video of your swap and maybe a write-up on one of the forums; people still actively read them but nobody is posting anymore."

I'll be taking down comments on that last video soon, I just wanted to make sure I didn't leave anyone hanging before shutting down the comments. I still get on this site from time to time, but I'm not what you would call "active". Seeing that a few people are reaching out with questions, I'll try to check in more often and see if I can get you pointed in the right direction! Hope this helps.
-John
 

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I've just set the motor and transmission back in the car. So far the only questions I have is the electrical. The resistors how many watts did you go with. I know some resistors don't reach their set ohm's until the wattage is met.
As far as resistance goes, I had to measure each solenoid to get that. As far as "set ohms", the resistor should have a stable ohmic value unless it gets really hot or really cold. Wattage is calculated based on expected operating current:

I(current) = V(volts) ÷ Ω(ohms)
12 volts ÷ 15 ohms = 0.8 amps (800 milliamps) and once you've calculated current:

P(watts) = V(volts) x I(current)
12 volts x 0.8 amps = 9.6 watts

If you measure a solenoid and it comes to say, 15 ohms, you will need a 15 ohm resistor rated for AT LEAST 9.6 watts. You could get any wattage over that, such as 10 watts or 100 watts. The higher the wattage rating, the better it will be able to dissipate heat. Any lower wattage will just open/burn up.

There's one solenoid assembly that looks like two solenoids cast into one unit, and it has a plug that has two wires. I learned the hard way that this is definitely two separate solenoids: consider each of the two wires as a single positive wire going to a single solenoid, with the solenoid body acting as negative/ground and completing the circuit... don't just throw a resistor between the two wires or you'll get a fault code for BOTH solenoids 🤣😆

Again, set up your multimeter and measure the old solenoids to get their resistance value. Or... you can do what I did for the first month or two and just leave the old solenoids plugged in! They have the exact value the ECU is looking for, they plug right in, and they come off your old automatic transmission so they don't cost anything. The hard part is deciding where to put them 🤣😆 not really any good places! Hope this helps.
-John
 

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Hello, you may be the person that reached out on YouTube :) Here's a quick copy/paste of my reply there:

"If your car is 1998-1999, I don't know if my technique works with that ECU, those are distributor ignition and I've never tried it on one. As for not starting, my advice is to make sure the old transmission range switch is plugged in, route it up and near the left fender for easy access. From there, "shift" the ECU into Park or Neutral, then try to start the car. Make sure the shift indicator in the dash shows P or N selected. If it starts in Park or Neutral, then you missed the starter cut relay in the driver's side (USDM) fuse panel in the dash, it's the little panel on the side of the dash that comes off and has fuses under it. That relay either needs to be bypassed, or tied into the clutch pedal switch like I did.

If the car still does not start with the range switch in P or N, I would advise checking normal no-start items like spark, fuel and a quick look at your fuses. Also, make sure your security isn't the issue- the little blinking key light in the dash should go out. If it stays blinking, your key is not being seen by the receiver in the steering column or you may have an open wire in that circuit going to the ECU.

As for the person that reached out with a no-start swap, he only said that he eventually got the car running... he never said how. That seems to be the trend with the 6th gen Accord- the people that make the breakthroughs and awesome workarounds seem to never share with the world, and the few people interested in this car and its swaps get left behind.

Comments are gone now..... yeah.... I learned back in 2006 just how bad some people can be online, especially as it pertains to Honda stuff. In the last 2 months, I've seen a lot of trolling on my channel, I'll leave it at that. It sucks not being able to reach out and help folks like yourself but I don't want the comments on my videos to devolve into an extension of the stuff that happens on forums 🤮. I hope that even without comments, the videos have enough info to get a motivated individual where they need to be. Don't think of it as a step-by-step, it's definitely NOT that 🤣😆 if you can get your hands on a Haynes or Chilton (or Helm Inc. if you have the money!) and if you have a decent grasp of car wiring diagrams, you'll get it going. Be sure to have a code scanner on hand- pending faults won't light up the check engine light. I'll leave this up for a day or two, hope it gets to you before I take down comments on this video too! Good luck with your swap. Consider making a video of your swap and maybe a write-up on one of the forums; people still actively read them but nobody is posting anymore."

I'll be taking down comments on that last video soon, I just wanted to make sure I didn't leave anyone hanging before shutting down the comments. I still get on this site from time to time, but I'm not what you would call "active". Seeing that a few people are reaching out with questions, I'll try to check in more often and see if I can get you pointed in the right direction! Hope this helps.
-John
Yes sir I'm the one that reached out on youtube. The car would crank, start and run when I first started this project. But then for some reason I had missed a video where you updated somethings. You change the neutral to reverse. And the car hasn't started or even rolled over since. I thought I had read somewhere about the starter cut out relay. But when I went back to look everything was gone. So that has to be my problem. Do you remember how you tied the clutch pedal switch in with this relay?
 

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Yes sir I'm the one that reached out on youtube. The car would crank, start and run when I first started this project. But then for some reason I had missed a video where you updated somethings. You change the neutral to reverse. And the car hasn't started or even rolled over since. I thought I had read somewhere about the starter cut out relay. But when I went back to look everything was gone. So that has to be my problem. Do you remember how you tied the clutch pedal switch in with this relay?
If you tied the grey wire from the transmission range switch (starter cut relay!) to whichever gear you drive in (1 or 2) then you won't have to worry about it- on the automatic transmission it gets tied to P or N when those are selected. Since I was using gear 2 for everything, I tied the grey wire to the blue wire on the range switch. As for using the clutch pedal switch, it's not necessary unless you want the car to NOT start with the pedal up- just make sure to never start it in gear 🤣😆 it will take you for a quick ride!
About this video:
"change neutral to reverse" that was a mistake on my part just before filming; I was messing around with the relay and I put the wrong wire back on... during testing, I put spade connectors on all of the wires from the old range switch so I could play around and see how the ECU would act with various gears selected. I even drove around with NO gear selected! You can... but the ECU sees that no gear is selected and throws a code, I forget which one. Also, when NO gear is selected, you don't have VTEC and the rev limiter activates at 5,000 RPM. From the beginning, it was supposed to use R for reverse, not N 🤣😆
Also, I was initially using the clutch pedal switch to "shift" into N with the clutch pedal pressed; this was my first workaround for getting it to start. After some time driving around like that, I noticed that the ECU was kind of freaking out about being shifted into Neutral so much, especially under heavy acceleration. VTEC would drop out as soon as it hit neutral, and once I let off the clutch pedal, it would not re-engage until maybe 4,000-5,000 RPM. Basically, it was acting buggy and goofy so I just used the starter cut relay wire on the range switch (grey) and tied that in. I did get it wired up to the clutch pedal, but I never made any diagram of it and have subsequently forgotten how I did that! However, I may have an opportunity to work on the car again- the new owner had a wiring issue and reached out for help so if/when I help out, I'll take a quick look and document what I did with the clutch pedal.

***If you are using a given setup and it works, then change something and it doesn't work, the first way to confirm that your change is the problem is to put it back the way it was and see if it still works! If it does, then your configuration change is the culprit. If not, then something else has likely happened.
 

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Ok so tie the gray with the blue wire. Now what about the cruise cut off? Do I keep that connected to the blue wire as well? Mechanically I can do anything. Wiring I'm a little slower. Lol also with the resistors. Shouldn't the wattage be figured with 14 volts instead of 12? When the car is running the changing system is putting out 14 volts
 
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