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Is it okay to run the remote wire next to/ in the same wire loom as the power wire that connects to the battery? I am running the remote wire and power wire on one side of the car. The speaker and rca's on the other side.
 

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You'll be fine running running the remote wire on either side. In fact, some RCA's have remote wires built in.

Besides.... running RCA's separate from power wires is a great myth started in the 80's... you'll be fine running RCA's anywhere. :D
 

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Vestax said:
You'll be fine running running the remote wire on either side. In fact, some RCA's have remote wires built in.

Besides.... running RCA's separate from power wires is a great myth started in the 80's... you'll be fine running RCA's anywhere. :D
That's actually a return ground wire on the RCA cable. But you can use it for a remote wire. Usually you'll be OK but if there's a difference in the ground at the amp and the radio it can cause a ground loop, that sounds like a hum in your audio system.

"A ground loop is probably the greatest cause of noise problems in car audio. A ground loop is more than one ground path where the differences in current potential of each path create a voltage differential. This can allow alternator whine to enter the system, as well as other problems. A ground loop is created by any non-zero resistances between the wiring paths used to ground or interconnect each piece of equipment." (MECP Basic Certification Study Guide, pg 55)

RCA's shouldn't be run next to power wires, its not a myth, it just doesn't always cause a problem.

"Cables that are too close together, or too close to stock wire looms, can pick up what is known as induced or coupled noise. Proper wiring technique is essential - power and signal cables MUST NOT be run together and should be SEPERATED by at least 18 inches. If you have to route power and signal cables over one another, its best that they cross at a 90 degree angle. This practice will reduce or elimiate induced noise." (MECP Basic Certification Study Guide, pg 98)

Subwoofer amps usually filter out the noise along with the higher frequencies, so you can get away with running the RCA cables down the same side of the car as the amp's power wire.

T.M.I., I know. But I'm bored and I need 5 posts to start a thread :) He's correct about running the remote wire next to the RCA signal cable, though. No worries there.
 

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Nate_6thGen said:
That's actually a return ground wire on the RCA cable. But you can use it for a remote wire. Usually you'll be OK but if there's a difference in the ground at the amp and the radio it can cause a ground loop, that sounds like a hum in your audio system.

"A ground loop is probably the greatest cause of noise problems in car audio. A ground loop is more than one ground path where the differences in current potential of each path create a voltage differential. This can allow alternator whine to enter the system, as well as other problems. A ground loop is created by any non-zero resistances between the wiring paths used to ground or interconnect each piece of equipment." (MECP Basic Certification Study Guide, pg 55)

RCA's shouldn't be run next to power wires, its not a myth, it just doesn't always cause a problem.

"Cables that are too close together, or too close to stock wire looms, can pick up what is known as induced or coupled noise. Proper wiring technique is essential - power and signal cables MUST NOT be run together and should be SEPERATED by at least 18 inches. If you have to route power and signal cables over one another, its best that they cross at a 90 degree angle. This practice will reduce or elimiate induced noise." (MECP Basic Certification Study Guide, pg 98)

Subwoofer amps usually filter out the noise along with the higher frequencies, so you can get away with running the RCA cables down the same side of the car as the amp's power wire.

T.M.I., I know. But I'm bored and I need 5 posts to start a thread :) He's correct about running the remote wire next to the RCA signal cable, though. No worries there.
Oh oh.... here we go, pulling information from a handbook for an installers again. I guess I got certified for the hell of it, but then again, MECP also says certain drivers are tailored to specific music. YAY 15's is for rap only! :rolleye2:

I know that the extra piece of wire is for, and you should also know the outer shield of your RCA's ends up at ground as well. How often does anyone use what it was intended for?

Running power wires separate from RCA's rule of thumb was introduced probably in the early ages of poorly constructed RCA's used in cars. Open up a physics book, and look up the right hand rule. This relates to why many thought that heat and magnetism would be induced on wires.... disregarding the fact that one's DC and the other's AC.

So as a result.. you get people everywhere (including the MECP) telling everyone to run their power wires separate from RCA's. Then you start to ask yourself these questions...
There is DC voltage going through my stock wires.. why aren't my RCA's picking it up?
My car chassis completes the circuit, why aren't my RCA's picking this up either?

Simply put, any noise going through the system will also end up at the ground plane.

Hey sure it's good practice. It's also good practice to save time to run RCA's, power wires, speaker wires together.... have us installers encountered noise? Nope, never. If you're paranoid, by all means run them separate. :D

If you've encountered noise in your system, it's either going to be a shotty install or equipment, but hardly ever the issue of running power wires with signal wires. You either prove that it can or you don't.
 

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Vestax said:
Oh oh.... here we go, pulling information from a handbook for an installers again. I guess I got certified for the hell of it, but then again, MECP also says certain drivers are tailored to specific music. YAY 15's is for rap only! :rolleye2:

I know that the extra piece of wire is for, and you should also know the outer shield of your RCA's ends up at ground as well. How often does anyone use what it was intended for?

Running power wires separate from RCA's rule of thumb was introduced probably in the early ages of poorly constructed RCA's used in cars. Open up a physics book, and look up the right hand rule. This relates to why many thought that heat and magnetism would be induced on wires.... disregarding the fact that one's DC and the other's AC.

So as a result.. you get people everywhere (including the MECP) telling everyone to run their power wires separate from RCA's. Then you start to ask yourself these questions...
There is DC voltage going through my stock wires.. why aren't my RCA's picking it up?
My car chassis completes the circuit, why aren't my RCA's picking this up either?

Simply put, any noise going through the system will also end up at the ground plane.

Hey sure it's good practice. It's also good practice to save time to run RCA's, power wires, speaker wires together.... have us installers encountered noise? Nope, never. If you're paranoid, by all means run them separate. :D

If you've encountered noise in your system, it's either going to be a shotty install or equipment, but hardly ever the issue of running power wires with signal wires. You either prove that it can or you don't.
You can install it however you want. Yep, its good practice. I usually run sub amp RCA's with the power wire, but not 4ch amps. Just in case.

Its not really DC voltage you want to worry about though, its the AC voltage from the alternator :)

Like they say, pick any 2: Cheap, Fast, or Good.
 
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